Army Reserve Soldiers Train Afghan National Army

Army Reserve Magazine, January 1, 2003 | Go to article overview

Army Reserve Soldiers Train Afghan National Army


Global News

Recently, more than thirty Soldiers with the 75th Division (Training Support), an Active component/Reserve component training support division headquartered in Houston, Texas, volunteered to deploy to Afghanistan for an initial six-month deployment to train the Afghan National Army (ANA) in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Usually, members of the 75th serve as Observer Controllers/Trainers who train and mobilize Army Reserve and National Guard Soldiers in the Southwestern and Midwestern parts of the United States. However, because of the current strains imposed upon the active Army by the continuing hostilities in Iraq, members of the 75th were asked to deploy to Afghanistan to provide their support.

Still a dangerous place even two years after the fall of the Taliban and the escape of Osama bin Laden, Afghanistan remains plagued by attacks against coalition Soldiers and Afghan civilians. For most of the 75th's Soldiers, this would be their first overseas deployment in a combat zone.

Upon their arrival, members of the 75th were separated into jobs that best fit their specialties, including finance, light infantry, and installation operations. "When we first arrived here, we helped the 10th Mountain set up finance operations at Camp Phoenix," said Maj. Isaac Johnson, who was placed in charge of the finance section that paid the U.S. Soldiers, the ANA, and the coalition forces.

According to him, he and Staff Sgt. Karmen San Nicolas made it more convenient for the Soldiers by enabling them to receive their pay at Camp Phoenix rather than Kabul or Bagram, both of which were more than an hour's drive away.

Maj. Tim Snyder, a member of the Division's 2nd Brigade, was the Senior Team Combat advisor for the 3rd Brigade Training Team (BTT). he explained that his BTT received several hundred ANA soldiers who had graduated from the Kabul Military Training Center, the equivalent of the U.S. Army's basic training.

"We trained them in advanced infantry tactics, and how to function as a battalion to perform combat and stabilization operations," said Snyder.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Army Reserve Soldiers Train Afghan National Army
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.