From Indigenismo to Zapatismo: Theory and Practice in Mexican Anthropology

By Gonzalez, Roberto J. | Human Organization, Summer 2004 | Go to article overview

From Indigenismo to Zapatismo: Theory and Practice in Mexican Anthropology


Gonzalez, Roberto J., Human Organization


This paper reviews the close relationship between theory and practice in Mexican anthropology, comparing and contrasting it to U.S. anthropology. The discipline in Mexico has successfully engaged public policy and politics in different ways, ranging from participation in the construction of nationalist ideologies to development anthropology to cooperation with popular movements. The experience of Mexican anthropology might provide U.S. anthropologists with creative ideas for connecting theory and practice in future projects.

Key words: history of anthropology, theory and practice, indigenismo, Mexico

Several U.S. anthropologists have observed recently that the discipline may be so detached from real world issues that it runs the risk of undermining itself. A commentary in The Chronicle of Higher Education noted that many cultural anthropologists are "pursuing trendy issues of postmodernism, blurred genres and identities, hermeneutic interpretation, voices of hegemony, and reflexivity...we are making ourselves increasingly irrelevant to contemporary policy and politics" (Thu 1999).1 At a symposium on secrecy in science organized by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Laura Nader (1999) stated that the discipline "is presently vastly hampered by both secrecy and self-censorship and in danger of becoming insular to the point of irrelevance except for literary and cultural studies concerns."

In this context, it may be instructive to trace the trajectory of anthropological theory and practice in other countries, particularly those in which the discipline is not perceived as irrelevant or insular. Mexican anthropology provides a revealing comparison to the United States because, for nearly a century, many anthropologists have conducted their work for practical purposes and have frequently engaged with policy makers. (For detailed analyses of the history of Mexican anthropology, see Garcia Mora 1987; Krotz 1991; Medina 1996; and Nahmad 1997.)

It has had complex results. For example, anthropology has helped provide modern medical facilities to millions of indigenous people and raised awareness of the multicultural nature of contemporary Mexican society, but it has also played a role in the displacement of tens of thousands in the wake of development projects. A number of distinguished anthropologists have critically assessed the current known as indigenismo (indigenism)-development anthropology seeking to integrate indigenous people into national life (Barabas and Bartolome 1974; Bonfil Batalla 1962; Stavenhagen 1971; Warman 1970). Those affiliated with Mexico's Instituto Nacional lndigenista (National Indigenous Institute, or INI) from the 1940s to the 1980s most frequently carried out indigenista (indigenist) projects.

Mexican anthropologists have interwoven theory and practice not only in the indigenista period but also in more recent years, demonstrating that the two need not exist separately. Theory has both informed and been informed by practice, and most anthropologists have not always given high priority to an analytical division of the two in the Mexican case. After reviewing the history of Mexican anthropology, I will return to a discussion of its relevance to debates in the United States regarding anthropological theory and practice.

Forjando Patria: Anthropologists and State Ideological Production, 1916-1939

For nearly a century after its independence from Spain, Mexico was racked by civil war between royalists and those seeking independence, liberals and conservatives, and regional leaders and centralists. The country was also attacked and invaded, first by the United States in a war that resulted in the loss of nearly half the country's territory and then by France, which occupied the country during the 1860s. The century ended with the 35-year dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz and a very deep popular peasant revolution.

Mexican anthropology was born in the twilight of the 1910 Revolution.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

From Indigenismo to Zapatismo: Theory and Practice in Mexican Anthropology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.