Memoirs of Slave Who Died in Vermont to Be Republished This Fall

Black Issues in Higher Education, June 17, 2004 | Go to article overview

Memoirs of Slave Who Died in Vermont to Be Republished This Fall


BURLINGTON, VT.

The last time Jeffrey Brace saw his parents was in Africa as he headed to the river for a swim with friends. "My mother pressed me to her breast, and warned me of the dangers of the waters, for she knew no other," Brace said. His father placed his own formal cap on his head and told him "to return before the setting of our great father the sun."

Brace, 16, never came back: The danger was not from the waters, but from English slave traders who came across the sea. "Eleven out of 14 were made captives, bound instantly," Brace would write later. They "were hurried to their boat, and within five minutes were on board, gagged and carried down the stream like a sluice; fastened down in the boat with cramped jaws.

"I was pressed almost to death by the weight of bodies that lay upon me; night approached and for the first time in my life, I was accompanied with gloom and horror," he said.

So began Brace's life as a slave in 1758, which ended many years later in freedom on a farm in Vermont. His story, recounted in a memoir published in St. Albans in 1810, is coming back to life.

The Blind African Slave; Or, Memoirs of Boyrereau Brinch, Nicknamed Jeffrey Brace will be published this fall by the University of Wisconsin Press. It tells the story of Brace's homeland, the brutal ship passage to the United States, his slave owners in Connecticut, fighting in the Revolutionary War, and his final years in Vermont, where he married and had children.

The memoir is a rare first-person account from the early years of slavery and perhaps the first book published in St. Albans, said Dr. Kari Winter, an associate professor at the University of Buffalo, who researched the book and wrote an introduction to the new edition.

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