President Addresses Nation


President George W. Bush addressed the nation from the U.S. Army War College in Carlisle Barracks on May 24. He outlined his policy in Iraq and declared that the Abu Ghraib prison, the scene of torture of Iraqi prisoners at the hands of their U.S. guards, will be destroyed. "We will demolish the Abu Ghraib prison," Bush told his immediate audience of servicemen, "as a fitting symbol of Iraq's new beginning."

The President outlined the five following steps to help achieve democracy and freedom in Iraq:

* Handing over authority to a sovereign Iraqi government.

* Establishing security.

* Continuing to rebuild Iraq's infrastructure.

* Encouraging more international support.

* Moving toward a national election "that will bring forward new leaders empowered by the Iraqi people."

The President acknowledged that the increase in troops on the ground in Iraq, up from a previous level of 115,000, resulted in 20,000 soldiers being extended in Iraq.

Congressional Control for Reserve Fund. The question at this writing is not whether Congress will authorize $25 billion in supplemental funds for Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. It will. The question is not whether the Bush administration will be given free rein over spending those funds. It will not. The question is what level of spending controls will be in the fine print of the supplemental contingency emergency reserve fund amendment. The administration sought flexibility to shift any part of the $25 billion among various Pentagon accounts, but both Republican-controlled bodies balked at that.

The Senate version of the bill specifies the accounts for $22.5 billion and gives the administration leeway to move $2.5 billion. The House version imposed more stringent controls, restricting unfettered flexibility to $1 billion and allowing another $2 billion to be shifted with additional congressional consent.

The two versions also are marked by substantial differences in how funds are allocated. The Senate version earmarks money in general, broad categories, allocating $20.5 billion of the total for operations and maintenance, for example. The House version delves into finer detail by assigning funds to specific projects, allocating, for example, $538 million of its $14.5 billion operations and maintenance funding for body armor procurement and $873 million to uparmor tactical wheeled vehicles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

President Addresses Nation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.