Developing a Model for a Supply Chain Management Major in a United States University in the New Millennium

By Bandyopadhyay, Jayanta K. | International Journal of Management, March 2004 | Go to article overview

Developing a Model for a Supply Chain Management Major in a United States University in the New Millennium


Bandyopadhyay, Jayanta K., International Journal of Management


With significant growth in supply chain activities in manufacturing and other industries in the United States, there has been a tremendous opportunity for preparing our university students into a Supply Chain Management (SCM) career path in this new millennium. This paper presents a model for developing a syllabus for a Supply Chain Management (SCM) course, and for developing a major prog ram in Supply Chain Management (SCM) to prepare students for meeting the needs and challenges of Supply Chain Management career path of manufacturing and service industries in the United States in this new millennium

Introduction

With significant growth in supply chain activities in manufacturing and other industries in the United States, there has been a tremendous need for preparing our university students into a Supply Chain Management (SCM) career path in this new millennium. Unfortunately, very few universities have a program in Supply Chain Management, and only a handful of universities has a Production/Operations Management major with a supply chain management course. Consequently, manufacturing and other industries in the United States have been facing a critical shortage of personnel in SCM areas, and unless efforts are made for launching some viable programs in SCM areas in American universities for preparing our university students in a SCM career path, our manufacturing and other industries may be heading towards a crisis.

Managers in nearly every industry have begun to realize that competition in this new millennium is no longer be a company against another company, but one supply chain against another supply chain.(13) This has been generating increasing needs for supply chain management practitioners, and giving birth to an entire industry of supply chain consulting companies. Demand for supply chain expertise has been growing exponentially in this decade. On the contrary, as late as 1995, a few business or engineering schools in the U.S. had courses dedicated to supply chain management. Currently, however, nearly every top business and engineering school has at least one dedicated course, and many more have integrated supply chain topics into a core POM course (20). Many schools of management and engineering are also adopting integrated curricula that prepare students to design and manage the resulting complex web of materials and information flows in global supply chains (21).

Evolution of Supply Chain Management Course

In April, 1995 a panel of academics gathered at the Spring INFORMS meeting to discuss the emerging interest in supply chain management (20). At that time, only a handful of universities taught a course with the title "Supply Chain Management," Of course, some were teaching some of the supply chain concepts in courses under the label "logistics" or "operations management." Currently, however, many top business schools and some engineering programs in the United States have a course entitled "Supply Chain Management" and more are added each year. In nearly all of the top management programs, the core operations management course has been augmented with significant content on supply chains management concepts (28).

Many skeptics would argue that this rush to change curriculum was little more than a repackaging of topics long covered in operations management such as logistics, inventory control, and facility location (27). Similar to "quality control" in the 1970s and "lean manufacturing" in the 1980s, "supply chain management" had been the popular management topic of the late 1990s. But a closer look at both business practices and MBA programs reveals stronger forces at work creating an environment ready for supply chain management concepts and integration may be the key unifying force behind the supply chain curriculum and practice (11). Although, industrial dynamics researchers like Jay Forester (1958) have maintained that supply chains should be viewed as an integrated system, and the practitioners of SCM might have long been interested in integration, due to lack of availability of information technology, it was impossible to implement "systems-oriented" approach until the recent explosion of information technology (21 ).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Developing a Model for a Supply Chain Management Major in a United States University in the New Millennium
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.