Cedric Sandford: A Tribute

By Bradbury, Malcolm; Lee, Norman et al. | Teaching Business & Economics, Summer 2004 | Go to article overview
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Cedric Sandford: A Tribute


Bradbury, Malcolm, Lee, Norman, Maunder, Peter, Robinson, Keith, Teaching Business & Economics


Professor Cedric Sandford, who ivas President of the Economics Association from 1984 to 1987, died on 5 March 2004, aged 79.

Keith Robinson came to know Ccdric as a fellow student. Keith recalls first meeting Cedric at Manchester University in the final year of the Economics, Politics and Modem History course in 1947/48. Keith began the course as a very young and immature student in 1943 and was allowed two years to complete Part I before being called up and serving two years in the Education Branch of the Royal Navy. The university to which he returned was very different from the one known two years earlier because it was powerfully influenced by some older students, many of whom had served for all or part of the war and had much time to make up to launch their careers. Cedric was one of this group who had joined the RAF in 1943 to train as a pilot and he was a gifted student who went on, after his first degree, to take an MA the following year. He then joined the staff of Burnley Municipal College and had a very successful start to his teaching career there.

Cedric was closely involved in the Economics Association from 1951 when he became the first Chairman of the Manchester and District Branch which later became the North Western Branch, one of the most lively and active as the Association grew from its small beginnings. he was involved in the formation of the National Association in the late 1950s and played a major part as it developed an important role in promoting the growth of the subject within the school curriculum in the next 25 years. He was one of the relatively few university staff to play a vital role in the development of the Association, and was a wise and respected counsellor with an engaging sense of humour from which we all benefited. It was very fitting that he completed his commitment by becoming the Association's President.

In 1960 Cedric moved to Bristol College of Science and Technology, becoming Head of the Department of General and Social Studies. From thai position he became involved in the creation of Bath University out of what then was a College of Advanced Technology. Cedric was appointed to a Chair in Political Economy and the first Head of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences in 1965 in the new university.

Cedric was someone who exhibited an enthusiasm for teaehing economies. He saw virtue in assisting the student of economies by looking at actual economic phenomena in detail. In 1970 Cedric, with Malcolm Bradbury, edited Case Studies in Economies - Economic Policy which offered a collection of illustrations of contemporary economic issues. In 1971 a companion volume, Case Studies in Economics Principles of Economics, again offered a supplement to existing textbooks with exercises for class use or as a textbook.

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