SIRS Government Reporter Adds New Unit to National Archives Documents

Information Today, February 2001 | Go to article overview

SIRS Government Reporter Adds New Unit to National Archives Documents


SIRS Mandarin, Inc. has announced that The United States at War: 1944, a new unit examining America's role in pivotal events at the end of the Second World War, can now be accessed on CD-ROM and in the National Archives Documents collection of the SIRS Government Reporter online reference database.

According to the announcement, the events of 1944 brought about the climax of U.S. involvement in a conflict that exacted an immense cost in terms of both resources and human life, while at the same time elevated the nation to the status of a world superpower. The United States at War: 1944 gives students access to primary sources that highlight America's role in events such as the D-Day invasion and brings to life the experience of war on the Pacific front. Documents also examine themes such as minority and human rights issues and home-front support of the war effort.

National Archives Documents are a collection of visual resources from the holdings of the National Archives and Record Administration (NARA) that highlight major themes throughout U.S. history. Documents include reproductions of primary sources such as charts, photographs, letters, drawings, and posters that illustrate key issues and prevailing public attitudes of a particular period. …

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SIRS Government Reporter Adds New Unit to National Archives Documents
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