Collaboration for Family-Work Roles

By Irvine, Ann | Vocational Education Journal, September 1995 | Go to article overview

Collaboration for Family-Work Roles


Irvine, Ann, Vocational Education Journal


This spring 12 students who were once considered potential dropouts graduated from the Lincoln Public Schools--seven of them with honors and four of them with scholarships. Most likely, all 12 would have dropped out if it weren't for a program in their schools for teen parents. Now they and their children can become healthy and financially responsible families. And taxpayers will save more than $648,000 in assistance over the next 15 years.

The Lincoln community, with a population of about 200,000, has become a partner with the Lincoln Public Schools family and consumer sciences program to better serve adolescent parents. The result of five years of work is a comprehensive, school-community program in four high schools and nine middle schools called the "Student-Parent Program." The program is funded by Perkins money, single parent and consumer and homemaking funds, Nebraska child abuse prevention funds, local private funds--such as foundations and health and human service agencies--service organizations and individual contributors. Currently, 43 community agencies, businesses, organizations and foundations are involved with the program. This collaboration has resulted in community education, guidance and health services, as well as student-child learning centers in two of the comprehensive high schools.

Since the program began in 1990, the number of students who remain in school has doubled from 109 to 208 in 1993-94. …

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