Grass Roots Humanities

By Beatty, Mary Lou | Humanities, May/June 2000 | Go to article overview

Grass Roots Humanities


Beatty, Mary Lou, Humanities


"I have fallen in love with American names," the poet Stephen Vincent Benet once wrote. "The sharp names that never get fat/ The snakeskin titles of mining claims/The plumed war bonnet of Medicine Hat/ Tucson and Deadwood and Lost Mule Flat."

Thirty years ago this summer, the National Endowment for the Humanities began an experiment that would change its future. Only five years old itself at the time, the Endowment was being prodded by Congress to share the work of the humanities more directly with the people. Faraway-sounding places like Deadwood and Lost Mule Flat were about to become less remote.

A testing began. Six states were selected. The Endowment would try different models of how a humanities program in the states might operate. Oklahoma and Maine were to look at a combined operation with existing state arts and humanities councils. Georgia and Missouri would look at the humanities as a part of a state's continuing education program. Wyoming and Oregon would form ad hoc committees and start from scratch-or in Latin, de novo. In the end, de novo was the choice-free-standing councils.

Growth came quickly. Within a year, eleven more states became involved: Alaska, Florida, Iowa, Kansas, North Carolina, Louisiana, Nevada, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Minnesota.

Ideas sprouted, too. A reading and discussion program in a living room in Vermont was adapted by the American Library Association and taken nationwide. From North Dakota, the blue-and-white striped tents of Chautauqua blossomed across the landscape west to Nevada and east to New Hampshire, with scholars playing Thomas Jefferson and Mark Twain and Louisa May Alcott. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Grass Roots Humanities
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.