Beating the Bugs

By Conlan, Michael F | Drug Topics, February 5, 2001 | Go to article overview

Beating the Bugs


Conlan, Michael F, Drug Topics


U.S. task force unveils coordinated government plan to combat antimicrobial resistance

An interagency task force has mapped the government's response to the rising threat of antimicrobial resistance (AR), including implementation of "appropriate" antibiotic use policies. "Unless AR problems are detected as they emerge-and actions are taken quickly to contain them-the world may be soon faced with previously treatable diseases that have again become untreatable, as in the preantibiotic era," said the federal panel in releasing a 44-page public health action plan.

That pre-antibiotic era ended in the 1940s with the widespread availability of penicillin and the discovery of streptomycin. But scientists and clinicians fear it may be returning with several microbes rapidly becoming drug-resistant, such as those that cause pneumonia, ear infections, and meningitis (e.g., Streptococcus pneumoniae); skin, bone, lung, and bloodstream infections (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus); food-borne infections (e.g., Escherichia coli); and infections transmitted in health-care settings (e.g., enterococci and Klebsiella).

The four major components of the plan-surveillance, prevention and control, research, and product development-are broken down into 84 action items. Thirteen considered "essential" to addressing the problem were assigned the highest priority. The plan will be implemented incrementally as resources become available. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Beating the Bugs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.