Battle Lines Drawn over Clinton's Appointment of Black Judge to 4th Circuit Court of Appeals

Black Issues in Higher Education, January 18, 2001 | Go to article overview

Battle Lines Drawn over Clinton's Appointment of Black Judge to 4th Circuit Court of Appeals


Battle Lines Drawn Over Clinton's Appointment of Black Judge to 4th Circuit Court of Appeals

President Clinton late last month appointed Virginia lawyer Roger Gregory to the all-White 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond.

And it didn't take long for conservative members of the U.S. Senate to undertake the task of keeping the 4th Circuit record of Black exclusion intact.

Sen. James M. Inhoe, R-Okla., vowed that he would block any effort to have Gregory named to fill the 10-year-old vacancy. He called Clinton's move an abuse of power. He also said it was "outrageously inappropriate for any president to fill a federal judgeship through a recess appointment in a deliberate effort to bypass the Senate."

On Dec. 27, in a bold move, Clinton took advantage of a congressional recess to appoint an African American to the most conservative court in the federal appellate judiciary. This was the first time in 20 years that a president has filled a judicial opening with a recess appointment, which allows him to seat a candidate while Congress is out of session.

"It is unconscionable that the 4th Circuit has never had an African American appellate judge," Clinton said during his announcement. "It is long past time to right that wrong. Justice may be blind, but we all know that diversity in the courts, as in all aspects of society, sharpens our vision and makes us a stronger nation."

Gregory, a 47-year-old Richmond corporate attorney, finds himself in the middle of a high-stakes political confrontation between Clinton and his senate judiciary committee nemesis Jesse Helms, R-N.C. Helms has used his position as committee chair to foil the nominations of three other African Americans nominated by Clinton to fill appellate vacancies, including the vacancy in the 4th Circuit, which is the longest standing vacancy in the federal appellate system.

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Battle Lines Drawn over Clinton's Appointment of Black Judge to 4th Circuit Court of Appeals
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