Interpretive Images in the Song of Songs: From Wedding Chariots to Bridal Chambers, by Steven C. Horine

By Provan, Iain | Shofar, Summer 2004 | Go to article overview

Interpretive Images in the Song of Songs: From Wedding Chariots to Bridal Chambers, by Steven C. Horine


Provan, Iain, Shofar


Studies in the Humanities 55. New York: Peter Lang, 2001. 235 pp. $59.65.

This interesting study on the Song of Songs seeks to clarify its complex imagery and rhetorical framework with a view to aiding an understanding of the text within its original context, in particular by identifying a paradigm of bridal chamber images which serves, it is claimed, as an interpretive framework for understanding the Song's erotic love lyrics, metaphors and motifs. After a brief Introduction (pp. 1-12) the author launches directly into his first substantive chapter, on the interpretive history of the Song (pp. 13-45). His particular interest here lies in showing how, in contrast to much recent interpretation of the Song, marriage has typically been understood to be the context of the love relationship described therein, and the presence of bridal chamber images has historically been noted at numerous points. Chapter 2 (pp. 47-72) proceeds then to introduce the proposed methodology for the project, described as "integrative literary" methodology, which is advanced as a synthesis of elements from both traditional and conceptual-metaphorical approaches and an improvement on both. This method engages first in genre identification, and then in the determination of primary imagery; the elucidation of an imagery paradigm based on the identification of primary organizational imagery; the determination of secondary imagery or motifs; and the analysis and synthesis of significant literary relationships. Chapter 3 (pp. 73-121) analyzes the primary interpretive imagery of the Song, and Chapter 4 (pp. 123-164) its secondary imagery, before the author moves to his Conclusion (pp. 163-169) and offers his own translation of the text (pp. 171-181). The bridal chamber is identified as primary imagery, since it constitutes the central metaphor of the Song -- much emphasis here is laid upon the Song's introduction as a proleptic summary to the work as a whole and on the particular connection between the beginning and the end of the book (8:13-14).

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Interpretive Images in the Song of Songs: From Wedding Chariots to Bridal Chambers, by Steven C. Horine
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.