Violence in Homes and Communities: Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment / Issues in Children's and Families' Lives

By Anderson, Kristin L. | Journal of Marriage and Family, February 2001 | Go to article overview

Violence in Homes and Communities: Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment / Issues in Children's and Families' Lives


Anderson, Kristin L., Journal of Marriage and Family


Violence in Homes and Communities: Prevention, Intervention, and Treatment. Thomas P.Gullotta & Sandra J. McElhaney (Eds.). Vol. 11 in the series Issues in Children's and Families' Lives. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 1999. 326 pp. ISBN 0-7619-1003-4. $65.00 cloth, $29.95 paper.

Violence scholarship is fragmented by topical specialization (e.g., child maltreatment, homicide) and disciplinary divisions. A primary contribution of this edited volume lies in its integration of scholarship on "public" (community and workplace) and "private" (child and partner abuse) violence. The first four chapters review research on the incidence and etiology of child maltreatment, partner violence, workplace violence, and community violence. The next section includes chapters on three "special topics": television violence; racial, ethnic, and religious hatred; and mental illness and violence. Three chapters focusing on social policy and violence prevention conclude the volume.

Several chapters encourage readers to think about connections between the forms of violence that affect the lives of children and adults within the United States. For example, Lynne McClure's chapter on workplace violence informs us that nearly half of the violent attacks against women and more than one third of violent attacks against men in the workplace are perpetrated by an acquaintance, friend, or relative, suggesting that many workplace assaults result from a "spillover" of domestic violence. In a chapter reviewing the alleged connection between mental illness and violence Michael Faenza, Robert Glover, Gail Hutchings, and James Radack report that when persons diagnosed with mental illness become violent, their target is most often a family member. An additional strength is an emphasis on the associations between violence perpetration and victimization. Daniel Flannery and Laura Williams's chapter on youth violence prevention recommends that prevention programs consider the impact of victimization among this population, and Faenza et al. describe the high rates of victimization among persons with mental disorders residing in psychiatric hospitals and juvenile correction facilities.

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