"Hall of Fame" Plaque Donated to AAFCS

By Crave, Mary | Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, January 1, 2000 | Go to article overview

"Hall of Fame" Plaque Donated to AAFCS


Crave, Mary, Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences


In 1999, Helen Strow, a former Distinguished Service recipient of our organization and a champion of internationally expanding our profession, was inducted into the International Adult and Continuing Education Hall of Fame. To honor our colleague, the International Division of AAFCS presented Helen's awards to AAFCS for display in the boardroom of Association Headquarters. A plaque and medallion were presented to President Carol Anderson during the Recognition Luncheon at the 2000 Annual Meeting.

In her half-century of service to her country and other nations, Helen Strow, through her adult and continuing education work, helped many people. A graduate of Ohio State University in home economics education, Helen was an extension agent and field supervisor in Ohio and Michigan in her early career.

During World War II she sailed on a troop ship to Europe and served as a Red Cross camp director aiding allied military troops. After the war she consulted on agriculture and home economics matters for the U.S. State Department's Marshall Plan. After working at the U.S. Department of Agriculture for 18 years, where she assisted and befriended thousands of visitors from more than 30 countries, she took on a fourth career. …

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"Hall of Fame" Plaque Donated to AAFCS
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