The Gullah People and Their African Heritage

By Rowland, Lawrence S. | South Carolina Historical Magazine, January 2001 | Go to article overview

The Gullah People and Their African Heritage


Rowland, Lawrence S., South Carolina Historical Magazine


The Gullah People and Their African Heritage. By William S. Pollitzer. (Athens: Univ. of Georgia Press, 1999. Pp. xxiii, 298. $40.00, cloth).

This is an excellent book. It should be added to every reading list for students of South Carolina history. The literature on the unique Gullah culture of the South Carolina and Georgia sea islands is growing in volume and substance each year. Much speculation and some invention surrounds this intriguing subject and fundamental questions of South Carolina history persist. Who are the "Gullah"? Where did they come from? What is the origin of their oft-observed African cultural retentions? Added to pioneering work by Samuel G. Stoney, Mason Crum, Guy B. Johnson, Guion G. Johnson, T.J. Woofter, Malcom Bell and Lorenzo Dow Turner in the 1930s and 1940s are excellent new studies such as Charles Joyner's Down by the Riverside (1984) and Margaret Washington Creel's Peculiar People (1988). To this distinguished list must now be added William S. Pollitzer's new book.

Professor Pollitzer has spent a career at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as professor of anatomy and anthropology. He brings a new perspective to the mystery of the Gullah, that of a medical geneticist. He is descended from a prominent family of post-Civil War Beaufort, South Carolina, and has visited the sea islands of South Carolina and Georgia regularly for more than fifty years gathering evidence for this study. His review of the literature is comprehensive and his analysis and summary is precise and convincing. What Pollitzer adds to this study is his own original scientific research on gene-types, genetic anomalies and blood-types as relates to Americans of African origin. The results are fascinating and add the authority of science to the cultural and historical observations of many previous scholars. Pollitzer's conclusion is that while African-American cultural and linguistic retentions derive from a variety of African origins, the predominant influence on the sea island Gullah culture is from the Congo and Angola (N'Gullah in Bantu) region of Africa. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Gullah People and Their African Heritage
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.