Die Doppelte Konfessionalisierung in Irland: Konflikt Und Koexistenz Im 16. Jahrhundert Und in der Ersten Hälfte Des 17. Jahrhunderts

By Lederer, David | The Catholic Historical Review, July 2004 | Go to article overview

Die Doppelte Konfessionalisierung in Irland: Konflikt Und Koexistenz Im 16. Jahrhundert Und in der Ersten Hälfte Des 17. Jahrhunderts


Lederer, David, The Catholic Historical Review


Die doppelte Konfessionalisierung in Irland: Konflikt und Koexistenz im 16. Jahrhundert und in der ersten Hälfte des 17. Jahrhunderts. By Ute Lotz-Heumann. (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck. 2000. Pp. xi, 510. DM 198,00.)

Traditionally, historiography represented early modern Ireland in two ways. The "faith and fatherland" tradition viewed the island as an essential historical category, unfathomable in terms of the Renaissance and Reformation. A "unionist tradition" located Ireland in three kingdoms of the British Isles. Both traditions relegated early modern Ireland to insular status, beyond the Pale of European affairs. Lotz-Heumann's study is a concerted effort to integrate Ireland into the mainstream of European historiography.

Her chosen method, the confessionalization paradigm, draws upon a German tradition. In the works of Ernst Walter Zeeden on confessionalism and Gerhard Oestreich on social disciplining, a Weberian model was employed to emphasize social change over theological polemics. Both authors paralleled the religious upheaval of the Reformation with processes of state-building partaken of equally by all confessions. Wolfgang Reinhard and Heinz Schilling subsequently molded their ideas into a comprehensive research program integrating cultural, political, and religious life as constituent elements of modernization. Lotz-Heumann's dissertation (supervised by Schilling) is a direct product of this German tradition.

Her book consists of three parts, addressing theory, periodization, and social engineering. Lotz-Heumann cogently identifies subtle interpretive shifts in Irish historiography since the 1930's.The Canny-Bradshaw debate of the 1970's ushered in two revisionist orthodoxies, a colonialist interpretation and the new British history. Lotz-Heumann recognizes theoretical limitations inherent in revisionism: A positivist over-reliance oil political narrative disconnected from cultural and social movements; partisan ecclesiastical history ignoring mutual exchanges and parallel developments between early modern churches; an inspired belief in an Irish Sonderweg, hindering comparative analysis; and arbitrary periodization. Confessionalization is proffered as a conceptual solution.

Part two reconsiders periodization from 1534 to 1641 (Supremacy to Cromwell) in a comprehensive synthesis of secondary literature. Confessionalization is broken into five phases, reflecting reactions to crown policies. …

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