India: Degree Verification Fees

By Gauthier, Grady | College and University, Summer 2004 | Go to article overview

India: Degree Verification Fees


Gauthier, Grady, College and University


According to the USEFI (United States Education Foundation in India) Web site, (www.fulbright-india.org/ eas/eas-general.htm), there are currently 74,603 Indian students in the United States. This immense cultural and educational exchange brings with it both rewards and difficulties for the students and the institutions who enroll them. One of the biggest obstacles faced by Indian students when trying to come to the u.s. to study at higher education institutions is the transfer of official records from Indian universities.

Many Asian countries' higher education institutions-including those of Indonesia, Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea-issue official sealed transcripts that often resemble U.S. transcript models. On the other hand, Indian higher education institutions usually supply a collection of mark-sheets (grade reports)-one for each year of study-combined with a degree certificate, if one has been obtained. These records, when sent to the u.s. with an application for transfer into an undergraduate program or entrance into a graduate program, are usually photocopies of the original records that were issued to the student. To be considered official by most u.s. institutions, these copies must be verified, stamped, signed, and sealed in an envelope by the main branch of the student's institution. The institutional charge for this process varies widely between different Indian universities. In addition to this charge, a student may also have to cover travel expenses to get to his or her affiliated college's main university branch, which can often be hundreds of miles away. Some Indian universities were researched for this article to show the wide discrepancy of cost between institutions. (Note: Offices where information was obtained are given when possible and the word 'transcript' is used only when the person contacted gave that description for the document issued for the student. …

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