Op Ed

Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, January 1, 2001 | Go to article overview

Op Ed


OPINION EDITORIALS

we are pleased at the level of communication that has been generated by recent issues of the Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences. Your commitment to express opinions about the content of the Journal is valuable to the profession. The following letters reflect a dialogue in our society about issues critical to the profession. Ed.

Dear Dr. Kinsey Green,

Upon receipt of the AAFCS newsletter today, I said, "Thank goodness, AAFCS has responded to Oprah Winfrey's comment during her Gore interview - regarding parenting education in the schools."

I immediately sent her a letter too. As my evidence that we are teaching "Parenting," I told her of the book Parenting: Rewards and Responsibilities, which I have written, that is used widely for such classes. Glencoe/McGraw Hill publishes this book and it is now in its sixth edition and used throughout the US and in some foreign countries, too. The sales have increased continuously since it first came out in 1980. It basically covers planning to become parents, family planning, how children grow and develop, and what a parent can do with that information in rearing children. The book is beautifully designed with color and photos of all ethnic groups in wonderful color. I've seen lots of books and it is very well produced. We have teacher aids in the teacher's edition.

Since Oprah operates out of Chicago, I gave her my editor's name, Sue Scott at Glencoe, and another home economist who teaches parenting in the Elgin schools. I hoped that she might develop a program segment on parenting education.

I visited the State Department of Education in Alaska and they had "kits" prepared with the book and illustrative materials ready to ship to the outer reaches of Alaska so anyone available could teach parenting. I've visited ITV classes in Kansas where three towns get a class taught at the same time by one teacher. Schools are making an effort, is my point.

The Littleton, Colorado teacher showed our "homemaker's" group of AAFCS-mostly retirees, the latest computerized doll that her students must take home for a weekend or overnight. She sets the computer for an "easy" or "difficult" infant - exactly newborn in size - and she can read when the infant doll is returned how attentive the student was to the infant's needs. Yes, an extensive effort. But this teacher is teaching Parenting with a capital P. I later saw a 15-year old with this type of doll with her family at a restaurant!

So, along with your efforts and other's efforts we've informed someone reading mail at Harpo - maybe not Oprah. What now?

We need to encourage teachers and supervisors to get some publicity on their programs. (A relative in a small town recently told me that they read in the local paper what the ag and shop kids are doing - "but not a word as to what the FHA [now FCCLA] or child development classes do.") So publicity would be important to educate many others. The joke about Martha Stewart "rediscovering" home economics is not a joke.

Someone could investigate getting a segment on Rosie O'Donnell or Oprah, or other talk shows. Likely needs a good recent angle but surely would help.

I thought you should know I'm ACTIVE. I have two books dated 2000 and another being revised for production before long.... I travel and volunteer. My granddaughters keep me young and happy.

Sincerely,

Verna Hildebrand, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus Michigan State University

AAFCS Staff:

I could not agree with Ms. Winifred C. Jardine more. Her OpEd in the Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, V.92, #4, 2000, concerning the direction our organization is going was right on line. It is past time we spoke out against the sanctioning of homosexuality as an alternative lifestyle. This is contrary to our objective of strengthening families. Nor should homosexuals be placed in positions of leadership within our organization.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Op Ed
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.