Soul of Community

By Baugher, Shirley L. | Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences, January 1, 2001 | Go to article overview

Soul of Community


Baugher, Shirley L., Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences


Safety and Security can be translated into many dialogues given our diverse interests and living environments. Issues include security in our schools; safety on the streets; security of our resources and safety and security within our homes and family. Community members in rural areas of our country define security and safety very differently from those of us in the city and suburbs. Run a search on the topics, and the range of responses are global to localfrom the world food supply to safety on our campuses and safety in the family. As I was writing this, I received multiple copies of an e-mail virus and also listened to a friend share about his online security being violated on the Internet. I began to wonder- given the multiple ways we use the words "safety and security," . . . what is the core issue?

My own reflections led me to consider that the issue is one of community within our environments. When are we safe? When do we feel secure? It is when we know that we are in community and trust that the community is there to support us as well as be supported by us.

The Blandin Foundation in Northern Minnesota has established a major funding initiative with local communities to examine their futures in economic and social transitions. The process includes identifying priorities of need within communities. Safety and security almost always appear in the top ten priorities as critical to the "soul of the community."

What is the soul of community? …

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