Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

Killing Us Softly 3: Advertising's Image of Women / Game Over: Gender, Race & Violence in Video Games

By Olson, Beth | Journalism History, Autumn 2000 | Go to article overview

Killing Us Softly 3: Advertising's Image of Women / Game Over: Gender, Race & Violence in Video Games


Olson, Beth, Journalism History


Killing Us Softly 3: Advertising's Image of Women. Northampton, MA: Media Education Foundation, 2000. 34 minutes. $295.

Game Over: Gender, Race & Violence in Video Games. Northampton, MA: Media Education Foundation, 2000. 41 minutes. $250.

These two videotapes are part of the most recent offerings from the Media Education Foundation; both are intended to provide an academic view on two pervasive media phenomena advertising images of women and video games. According to statistics quoted in the videotapes, advertising is an $180 billion a year industry; it's estimated that we see 3,000 ads each day; and we will spend 3 years of our lives watching TV commercials. Video and computer games are a $6 billion a year business; one out of every ten U.S. households owns a Sony Playstation; and children spend an average of ten hours per week playing video games.

Killing Us Softly 3 is the updated critique from Jean Kilbourne on representations of women in advertising. Kilbourne has spent more than 20 years analyzing the symbolic messages in advertising; her previous films were Killing Us Softly (1979) and Still Killing Us Softly (1987). Kilbourne presents more than 160 print ad examples (with some TV ads interspersed) in a lecture format, complete with a chiefly female audience and their reactions, which range from groans to (mostly) laughter. The audience reactions almost resemble a laugh track. However, Kilbourne strikes the right balance in tone, managing to be funny and then serious about the ad representations and their potential ramifications from low-self-esteem and eating disorders to normalizing violence against women.

One could consider the strength of the material to also be a weakness: some of the ad examples resemble mild erotica; ultimately, Kilbourne labels advertisers as pornographers. The representations of implicit violence against women and Kilbourne's graphic verbal descriptions may leave sensitive male and female viewers momentarily uncomfortable. On the other hand, such outrageously strong evidence validates her interpretations. One of her more valuable conclusions is that everyone both females and males are limited, wounded, and dehumanized by stereotypical depictions of masculinity and femininity in advertising.

In a rare discussion of the impact of video game consumption, Game Over: Gender, Race & Violence in Video Games combines wellillustrated examples from violent video games with interview comments from academics.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Killing Us Softly 3: Advertising's Image of Women / Game Over: Gender, Race & Violence in Video Games
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.