Slavery, Violence against Women Continue Worldwide

By Hanson, Jessica; Stanley, Anna | National NOW Times, Spring 2001 | Go to article overview

Slavery, Violence against Women Continue Worldwide


Hanson, Jessica, Stanley, Anna, National NOW Times


Despite extraordinary progress, women all over the world are still abused, enslaved and violated on a daily basis. The new millennium does not greet all women with the freedom and hope they deserve as human beings.

Although poor and violent conditions for women span the entire globe, two countries have caught the attention of the international community.

Young Women Flogged in Nigeria

In Nigeria recently, two women were flogged for alleged fornication. The first caning transpired in late January, when 17year-old Bariya lbrahim Magazu was lashed 100 strokes after it was discovered that she had conceived a child out of wedlock. The girl, who gave birth and was breast-feeding at the time of her caning, had no representation at the trial where she said she was impregnated by one of three middle-aged men with whom her father pressured her to have intercourse.

Originally sentenced to 180 lashes, the 80 strokes imposed for "making unsubstantiated allegations" against the men (who denied having sex with her) were dropped. The punishment was reduced and postponed due to mounting international pressure, including from human rights groups in Nigeria and a rebuke from the Canadian High Commission in Nigeria. Lawyers on Magazu's behalf applied to the Sharia Court on Jan. 9 for a leave to appeal and a stay of execution. The punishment was reportedly suspended for 12 months, but despite this, Magazu was whipped 100 times on the morning of Jan. 19.

The second young Nigerian woman is awaiting public flogging in November after being found guilty by a Sharia Court of engaging in pre-marital sex. Eighteenyear-old Attine Tanko was found guilty on Nov. 15 after the discovery that she was pregnant while unmarried. Tanko's 23-year-old boyfriend, who was also flogged 100 times and is currently sentenced to jail time, is the father. She has yet to give birth and is living with her family in wait. The court will allow the young woman to wean the baby for up to two years after she delivers, but she will receive the punishment of 100 lashes after that time.

Women Forced into Slavery Nightmare in Sudan

Across the African continent in Sudan, abuses against women occur on a regular basis. Arab militias, under the command of the president of Sudan and armed by the government, raid Dinka villages and attack the local people. Old men and women are killed, and children and young women are taken for booty.

The soldiers of this militia, known as Popular Defense Forces, systematically gang rape the enslaved African women and girls during and after these raids. Soldiers further torture the women with beatings, denial of food, and prolonged exposure to sun with their hands and feet tied together. Women slaves who are chosen as concubines by Arabs in northern Sudan are also genitally mutilated, a practice not normally followed by the people of this area. …

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