Using Force to Prevent Violence: An Evaluation of Theory and Practice

By Carment, David; Harvey, Frank et al. | International Journal, Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

Using Force to Prevent Violence: An Evaluation of Theory and Practice


Carment, David, Harvey, Frank, Vogel, Tk, International Journal


David Carment and Frank Harvey

Westport CT and London: Praeger, 2001, x, 179pp, US$55.00, ISBN 0-275-96979-7

Using Force to Prevent Violence builds on quantitative analysis and case studies of Bosnia and Kosovo to evaluate the circumstances that enable third parties - such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization - to use coercive diplomacy successfully in the prevention, management, and resolution of ethnic conflict. David Carment and Frank Harvey employ empirical methods and test results against many cases, which renders their study of fairly general applicability in determining which set of conditions will enable certain forms of coercion to succeed in preventing or settling ethnic conflict. While readers with no particular interest in quantitative methods may find the central parts a bit hard going, the authors are sensitive to context and contingency, which sets them apart from many other adherents of rational conflict theory. The book's underlying assumptions are entirely reasonable and contradict the sloppy thinking that informs so many accounts of ethnic war - not just the notion that ethnic conflicts are irrational, but also the opposite idea that powerful security dilemmas eliminate human agency and political context and compel ethnic groups to fight, a situation that can only be resolved through the forced separation and transfer of such populations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Using Force to Prevent Violence: An Evaluation of Theory and Practice
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.