State by State

By Clark, Susan | Humanities, March/April 2001 | Go to article overview

State by State


Clark, Susan, Humanities


A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by State Humanities Councils

ARIZONA

The Phoenix Museum of History opens its spring exhibition, "Getting around the Valley: Transportation in Early Phoenix," on March 31. The exhibition documents the history of transportation in the valley, with an emphasis on bicycles, streetcars, and automobiles ca. 1880-1930. In conjunction, a lecture series funded by the Arizona Humanities Council provides a forum for linking past and present issues of transportation.

COLORADO

"The Real Colorado Series: Rich in Contrast" is a series of programs that presents different Coloradan voices regarding religion, transportation, conversation, communication, culture, and socialization in Colorado. All programs begin at noon and are transmitted via a fiber-optic network to seven northeastern Colorado rural school districts.

"Reading the Law: Literature and Legal Ethics" is the second of five seminars on legal ethics. This seminar will use works of fiction to focus on issues of professional responsibility and attorney conduct. Participating members of the legal profession will be able to reflect upon the ethical and human dimensions of their work.

CONNECTICUT

The Cos Cob art colony was Connecticut's first art colony and the cradle of American Impressionism. From 1890 to 1920, more than two hundred art students studied at the Holley's boarding house with leading American Impressionists John Henry Twachtman, J. Alden Weir, Theodore Robinson and Childe Hassam. The exhibition in the Bush-Holley Historic Site Visitor Center in Greenwich displays photographs, art works, manuscripts, and memorabilia of the artists and writers who gathered in Cos Cob. Visitors can learn why artists and writers came to Cos Cob and the significance of the Holley family in establishing the art colony. The historical context of Impressionism is explained and the main characters at the art colony and their activities are introduced. The exhibition opens March 14 and runs through September 3, 2001.

IDAHO

The University of Idaho Press releases in March Written on Water: Essays on Idaho Rivers, an anthology compiled and edited by University of Idaho English Professor Mary Clearman Blew. The anthology is the first in a new series of imprints supported in part by the Idaho Humanities Council. The book features personal reflections on Idaho rivers by some of Idaho's finest writers, including William Studebaker, Kim Barnes, Lance Olson, Leslie Leek, Clair Davis, Joy Passanante, John Rember and Robert Wrigley. Speakers Bureau programs during March and April include Robert Sims, "Japanese Americans During World War II"; Janet Ward, "Mountain Lamb, Julia Ogden, Marie Dorion and Other Forgotten Women: Indian Wives of the Mountain Men"; Sara Edlin-Marlowe, "Sacagawea" and "A Conversation with Georgia O'Keefe"; and Arthur Hart, "Idaho's Ethnic Diversity."

ILLINOIS

Women composers are heard. See page 23.

IOWA

The popular Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition "Barn Again! Celebrating an American Icon" has inspired a "Barns of Iowa" poster, featuring round barns, octagonal barns, stone barns, western barns, dairy barns, and Amish barns; all photographed by Robert Campagna. Barns are disappearing from Iowa's landscape at a rate of approximately one hundred each year, and the statewide tour of "Barn Again!" addresses a number of cultural questions: How does a barn's function influence its form? What does a barn mean beyond its function? Why round barns, or stone barns? The "Barns of Iowa" poster lists the host sites of the traveling exhibition and is available through Humanities Iowa.

KANSAS

Oscar Micheaux, the United States' first black filmmaker, considered Great Bend his adopted home, and a festival in his honor takes place there March 23-25. Through film screenings, presentations by humanities speakers, music, and a wreath-laying ceremony at Micheaux's grave, participants learn about this author and director who influenced the works of contemporary directors such as Spike Lee, Tim Reid, and Robert Townsend.

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