Aircraft Rockets


The Aviation Rockets and Missiles (ARM) Project Office, under the PEO Tactical Missiles, was formed in August 2000 with the merger of the 2.75-inch Rocket Systems Project Office and the Air-toGround Missile Systems Project Office. The ARM Project Office manages the 70 mm rocket (formerly the 2.75-inch rocket), all variants of the Hellfire missile, and the advanced precision kill weapon system (APKWS).

The 2.75-inch (70 mm) Hydra 70 Rocket Family encompasses variants of the freeflight rocket that has become the standard ground-attack rocket. The design includes multiple warheads that can be used on the rocket motor.

Equipped with various fuzes, warhead options and target sets include: M261 tactical; M267 practice; M151 (10 pound) anti- ι personnel or canopy/soft bunker; M229 anti-personnel (17 pound); M274 smoke signature; M257 illumination; M264 smoke; M255A1 fléchette; and M278 infrared illuminating.

The Hydra 70 was used extensively in the Korean War, Vietnam War and Operation Desert Storm. It is a conventional ammunition item used by all U.S. services ; and many foreign countries. Both the 70 mm rockets and the Hellfire missiles are the primary armament for the U.S. Army's AH-64 Apache, OH-58D Kiowa Warrior and the U.S. Marine Corps' AH-IW Super Cobra helicopters.

Hydra program funding continues in FY 2003-06 to support transitioning technology to the Advanced Precision-Kill Weapon System (APKWS).

APKWS is currently in development and will provide a guided, low-cost, lightweight weapon that is effective against soft and lightly armored targets to fill the gap between the 70 mm rocket and the Hellfire missile. The system will be used by all Army aircraft currently using the 70 mm rocket. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Aircraft Rockets
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.