Next-Generation Soldier Weapons

Army, October 2004 | Go to article overview

Next-Generation Soldier Weapons


In addition to systems now in the field, PM Soldier Weapons is also developing the next generation of Army weapon systems.

The XM29 Integrated Airburst Weapon System (formerly, objective individual combat weapon) combines the lethality of 20 mm air-bursting munitions, 5.56 mm NATO ammunition and rugged full-solution fire control (a laser range-finder, laser pointer, illuminator, ballistic computer, video camera, direct-view optics, environmental sensors, electronic compass, target tracker, laser steering and thermal module). The XM29 will eliminate targets the M16 cannot: targets in defilade, in trenches, behind trees and on rooftops. Compared to the current M4 MWS, it increases the probability of incapacitation, doubles the standoff range to 1,000 meters and substantially increases soldier survivability.

The XM25 Airburst Weapon System is the air-bursting weapon subsystem of the XM29. It fires 25 mm high-explosive airbursting munitions.

The XM25 incorporates a target acquisition fire control that integrates thermalpowered direct-view optics, laser rangefinder, compass, fuze setter, ballistic processor and internal display. The weapon has a 300-meter point target range and 500-meter area target range and is capable of defeating defilade (hidden) targets. Spiral development of the XM29 will accelerate fielding of the XM25 subsystem in advance of the dual-barrel XM29 system.

The U.S. Army is also exploring a new 5.56 mm carbine design, designated as the XM8 Modular Assault Weapon System (formerly, lightweight assault rifle). The XM8 is based on the 5.56 mm kinetic-energy weapon component of the XM29. Offering levels of integration, modularity and scalability, the XM8 will provide improved tactical capabilities through the use of multiple barrel lengths and accessories. Barrels include a standard barrel, a compact barrel to increase portability for close quarters battle operations, a long barrel for a sharpshooter role and a heavy barrel for an automatic rifle role. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Next-Generation Soldier Weapons
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.