Rotary Wing


AIRCRAFT

The AH-1F Cobra Attack Helicopter was retired from the Army fleet in September 2001. Currently the inventory of airframes is being divested by a variety of methods that will make their final disposition most cost-effective to the Army. These methods include: harvesting parts to support U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Air Force rotorcraft programs; transfer to other federal agencies for training devices; sales to foreign allied nations; and donations to qualified organizations for display/demonstration. Final demilitarization and disposal must be accomplished by September 30, 2006.

The Army's 2000 Aviation Force Modernization Plan noted that these aircraft possess "inadequate flight performance, weapons and mission equipment to meet requirements and are becoming increasingly problematic from a maintenance and safety standpoint" and called for their retirement in September 2001.

The AH-6/MH-6 Little Bird (Cayuse) Helicopter is in service with the Army's 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) (SOAR). Following service in Vietnam, the Army's fleet of OH-6 light observation and command helicopters (LOACH) was reassigned to Army National Guard units. With their excellent roll-on/roll-off mobility and extremely high power-to-weight ratios, however, the aircraft subsequently were tapped for special operations applications in 1980.

Capability upgrades include performance, avionics, navigation, communications, targeting, weapons and night operations. Although primarily equipped with the 7.62 mm minigun or Hydra 70 (2.75-inch) rocket system, the AH-6/MH-6 can accommodate a range of gun and rocket options.

The mission-enhanced Little Bird (MELB) program is a major modification to the existing AH-6/MH-6 fleet. The modification is packaged as a kit that replaces existing components on the aircraft. The new MELB aircraft will have a six-blade main rotor system, a four-blade tail rotor, an improved drive train and the AlIison 250-C30R3 full-authority, digital-engine control (FADEC). The MELB also incorporates an improved landing gear, crashworthy fuel cells, enlarged rear doors and external extended-range fuel tanks. The MELB modifications will change the look and performance of the AH-6/MH-6 aircraft.

The MELB program aims to increase the performance and safety margins of the existing Little Bird aircraft. The modifications increase the maximum gross weight of the aircraft to 4,700 pounds; improve the high/hot performance capabilities of the aircraft; and move the extended-range fuel tanks from inside the cabin area, thereby increasing the cabin space available to the supported ground commander. In addition, there is a concurrent program to improve the weapon management system for the AH configuration. The MELB program boosts the performance and extends the life of the AH-6/MH-6 aircraft.

The AH-64A Apache Helicopter provides day, night and adverse weather attack helicopter capability. The Apache is the Army's primary attack helicopter. It is a quick-reacting, airborne weapon system that can fight both close and deep to destroy, disrupt or delay enemy forces. The Apache first entered service inventories in 1984.

The aircraft is designed to fight and survive throughout the world. It is equipped with a target acquisition designation sight and a pilot night-vision sensor that permit its two-man crew to navigate and attack in darkness and adverse weather. The Apache's principal mission is to destroy high-value targets with the Hellfire missile. It also is capable of employing a 30 mm M230 chin-mounted automatic cannon and Hydra 70 rockets that are lethal against a variety of targets.

The Apache has a maximum speed of 145 knots. It has a maximum gross weight range of 240 nautical miles (A model) and 230 nautical miles (D model) with range extension capability utilizing internal and external tanks. The Apache has a full range of aircraft survivability equipment and the ability to withstand hits from rounds up to 23 millimeters in critical areas. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Rotary Wing
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.