Air Traffic Control Systems


Army air traffic services provide Army aviation the assets required to ensure safety and survivability on the modern battlefield. Tactical air traffic control (ATC) supports air and land component commanders' automated airspace command and control requirements and ATC for aircraft operating in terminal and rear operation areas. In turn, air traffic services support is critical to fixed-base force projection platforms, a function that mitigates risks to Army aircraft operating from Army airfields worldwide.

To meet these needs, the Office of the Product Manager for Air Traffic Control Systems (PM ATC), assigned to the Aviation and Missile Command at Redstone Arsenal, Ala., manages the modernization of the tactical and nontactical ATC equipment.

Major tactical ATC programs include the air traffic navigation, integration and control system (ATNAVICS), tactical airspace integration system (TAIS) and the mobile tower system (MOTS).

The Air Traffic Navigation, Integration and Control System (ATNAVICS) is a Humvee-mounted, survivable radar system that will support a highly mobile tactical area surveillance and precision approach air traffic control system. It will replace the technologically obsolete and !insupportable landing control central (AN/TSQ-71B). The system will provide expeditious air traffic flow, permitting continuous unimpeded operations and will provide area navigational assistance, integrate air traffic during joint/combined operations and coordinate air movement within the Army airspace command and control (A^sup 2^C^sup 2^) system. The ATNAVICS will facilitate the safe handling of air traffic at Army terminal airfields, landing sites or zones at division, corps and echelons above corps. All components of the system can be loaded onto a single C-130 aircraft for deployment to any location. In addition, the system can be sling-loaded by a CH-47.

The AN/TSQ-221 Tactical Airspace Integration System (TAIS) is the most recently fielded modern tactical ATC system. In addition to being an ATC system, the TAIS is also the Army battle command system (ABCS) that will perform the A2C2 function. The TAIS will provide the commander with an automated capability to effectively, efficiently and safely manage the use of airspace over the area of operations for which he is responsible. TAIS will be located at division, corps and echelons above corps, integrating ATC and A2C2 capabilities between ATC systems and the ABCS.

TAIS is currently fielded at Fort Hood, Texas, and Fort Bragg, N.C., and replaces the AN/TSC-61B flight control central system. A total of 39 TAISs will be delivered to the Army.

The Mobile Tower System (MOTS) will be a highly mobile tactical air traffic control system designed to be rapidly set up and to quickly establish air traffic services during the initial phases of deployment and sustain those services throughout operations and redeployment.

The system will be mounted on a Humvee, be C-130-deployable and helicopter sling-loadable, with digital jam-resistant communications. The MOTS will provide air traffic services in airspace designed for air traffic movement at terminal areas of the division, corps and echelons above corps during wartime and stability and support operations. MOTS will provide numerous services, including sequencing and separating arriving and departing aircraft, coordinating instrument meteorological condition recovery of aircraft, coordinating in-flight emergencies, search and rescue, and combat search and rescue missions.

In peacetime, the MOTS will support Army air traffic services training requirements and aviation units during tactical field training exercises, along with supporting other agencies, host nations, joint services and other Army missions, as required. The Army operational requirement is to deploy 38 MOTS. The tactical ATC systems are derivatives of commercial offthe-shelf technologies or derivatives of other military systems.

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