Air Defense Systems


In July 2003, the Program Executive Office (PEO) Air and Missile Defense's mission was expanded to include Army space programs, and the PEO was renamed the U.S. Army Program Executive Office, Air, Space and Missile Defense (PEO ASMD).

PEO ASMD is responsible for the management, acquisition, and fielding of landbased air and cruise missile defense systems, including short-range air defense (SHORAD), medium extended air defense system (MEADS), Patriot/PAC-3, joint tactical ground station (JTAGS), joint land attack missile defense elevated netted sensors (JLENS), and the Army's tactical exploitation of national capabilities program (TENCAP).

Today's Stinger-based SHORAD forces are highly déployable and provide the shoot-on-the-move capability and mobility necessary to support the maneuver force. The SHORAD system has four basic components: missiles, launch platforms, Sentinel radars and the forward area air defense command control system (FAAD C^sup 2^) tactical operations center (TOC).

SHORAD is transforming from a system-centric Current Force capability to a capabilities-centric Future Force, enhanced area air defense system (EAADS). The EAADS capability is envisioned to be a mix of kinetic and directed energy systems capable of overmatching traditional air and cruise missile defense threats and the evolving rockets, artillery and mortar (RAM) threats. The current overarching air and missile defense (AMD) architecture consists of launchers, missiles, sensors and battle management command and control, communications and computer intelligence (BMC4I) from a number of different Army and joint systems. The EAADS capability will fight side-by-side with the current Stinger-based force and incrementally replace Stinger-based systems. This capability provides an order of magnitude increase in battlespace available against cruise missiles (CMs), unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and fixed-wing (FW) and rotary-wing (RW) aircraft over the current Stinger-based systems (MANPADS, Avenger and Linebacker). The critical initial EAADS Block I capability will be achieved through the deployment and integration of surface launched AMRAAM (SLAMRAAM) systems, Sentinel (ETRAC) augmented by other necessary sensors and BMC4I. SLAMRAAM, a unit of employment (UE) asset, will be task-force organized to the unit of action (UA) as an integrated weapon system (launcher, organic sensor, and BMC^sup 4^I). SLAMRAAM's capability-centric system will allow the use of external data sources to assist in developing a single integrated air picture/ground picture (SIAP/SIGP) network interoperability with all AMD systems and the Future Combat Systems (PCS) battle management network.

Surface Launched Advanced Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (SLAMRAAM), is a net-centric Block I of EAADS extended-range capability in support of the Future Force. Critical initial EAADS Block I capabilities will be achieved with the SLAMRAAM system of systems through the development of a fire unit and BMC4I/integrated fire-control station (IFCS); integration of Sentinel enhanced target range and classification (ETRAC) and joint land attack cruise missile defense elevated network sensor (JLENS); and AMRAAM missile. The SLAMRAAM BMC4I will be fully integrated and compatible with Army AMD and the Future Combat System (FCS) networks. SLAMRAAM provides a critical overmatch capability against the rapidly evolving CM, UAV, FW and RW.

The AN/MPQ-64 Sentinel is an advanced, three dimensional, battlefield X-band air defense phased-array radar with an acquisition range of 40 km. Sentinel transmits its radar imagery to the FAAD C^sup 2^ via radio frequency link. Sentinel is being upgraded to the ETRAC configuration that doubles its range and will integrate with future AMD BMC^sup 4^I via SLAMRAAM.

Envisioned as an Army "inner tier" capability for EAADS, the Mobile Tactical High Energy Laser (MTHEL) program will develop the first mobile directed energy weapon system capable of acquiring, tracking, engaging and destroying air-tosurface munitions, CM, UAV, RAM projec tiles and surface-launched ballistic missiles. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Air Defense Systems
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.