Book Reviews -- Men, Women, and Infertility by Aline P. Zoldbrod

By Weiss, Fran | American Journal of Psychotherapy, Summer 1994 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews -- Men, Women, and Infertility by Aline P. Zoldbrod


Weiss, Fran, American Journal of Psychotherapy


ALINE P. ZOLDBROD: Men, Women, and Infertility. Lexington Books, New York, 1992, 256 pp., $29.95.

Men, Women, and Infertility is intended to give therapists with no background in infertility an insight how both men and women feel about this complex issue, as well as some new therapeutic techniques for dealing with it. It is not slated as a beginner's primer, but intended for the trained therapist who does not specialize in infertility. Some new techniques are to be offered as patient-coping strategies.

The author certainly meets her first goal. The volume's overview of infertility is full and references are well documented. Zolbrod gives the reader a valuable insight into the feelings of both men and women and identifies potential emotional problems for these couples, including the impact of infertility on individual perceptions and sexuality.

However, the book falls short in crucial areas. The author emphasizes that her writing is for the trained therapist, yet many of her comments are pitched at the inexperienced student. For example, she warns that empathy is not enough for working with a patient, when every trained therapist understands that empathy and the therapeutic alliance is merely the starting point for any given treatment.

In the preface, Zolbrod says she works largely with a healthy, white middle-class population but fails to explain until Chapter 5 that the behavioral techniques she offers may not be appropriate for patients diagnosed with character disorders. It would have been far more helpful if the author had disclosed this information initially for the reader and not revealed it so casually in the text.

Finally, the author cautions the reader about the potential problem of "theoretical eclecticism in the text where she bounces between perspectives of feminism, behavioral medical psychology, and psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy and multimodal therapy." She is right, it is confusing. Nevertheless, much of the book is devoted to multimodal therapy at the expense of other modalities and the argument in support of this type of therapy is further downgraded because of sloppy editing.

The book is composed of three parts, and divided into 11 chapters plus an appendix. Part I, Introduction, notes that 12 percent of American couples of child-bearing age are infertile. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Book Reviews -- Men, Women, and Infertility by Aline P. Zoldbrod
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.