Nathan Hart

By Indyke, Dottie | Southwest Art, November 2004 | Go to article overview

Nathan Hart


Indyke, Dottie, Southwest Art


AN OKLAHOMA ARTIST CARVES OUT A SPECIALTY IN WOOD TURNING

NATHAN HART MAY BE THE ONLY professional Native American wood turner in the country. A former football star, Hart has coached sports as well as worked to improve the economic status of Oklahoma tribes, but three years ago he chucked the nine-to-five routine for a career as an artist.

"I had a goal early on of wanting to make furniture," recounts the 42-year-old, who lives in Oklahoma City. "But, at the time, the cost of the equipment was so great that I just purchased a lathe and started turning bowls to see what it was like. I found what I wanted in wood turning."

A burgeoning genre, wood turning involves the hollowing of solid logs into sculptural and functional pieces, such as platters, bowls, and vessels with small mouths that mimic ceramic pots. Hart specializes in the latter; his pots range in size from 2 to 20 inches and are made of native Oklahoma woods like pecan, hackberry, walnut, and oak.

His particular interest is in using the burl, or knot, and in spotlighting spalted grain, the unique striated patterns that are the result of moisture trapped inside the wood. He encourages the spalting process by sealing the end of a log with paraffin and storing it under a pile of wood shavings.

Sometimes, the final adornment on his handsome vessels is a single, simple motif borrowed from his Cheyenne ancestors-for example, the symbol for a morning star or a mountain or a lodge-which he carves into the wood and inlays with stone or a contrasting piece of wood.

"For me, the appeal of wood turning is the process of taking the raw material in an untouched state and making something out of it," says Hart. "Wood has interesting grain patterns and characteristics. And it's all nature's beauty."

HART STRADDLES VASTLY DIFFERENT WORLDS. His Cheyenne grandfather and father were leaders of the Indian Mennonite Church, a blend of austere evangelical Protestantism and traditional Native language and practice. His Caucasian mother, who is also a practicing Mennonite, met his father at the church-affiliated Bethel College in Kansas, the state where Hart was born. When he was 2, the family settled in Clinton, OK, on a 50-acre spread a mile away from the nearest neighbor.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nathan Hart
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.