Women: Engendering Citizenship in Egypt

By MacLeod, Arlene | The Middle East Journal, Spring 2001 | Go to article overview

Women: Engendering Citizenship in Egypt


MacLeod, Arlene, The Middle East Journal


Engendering Citizenship in Egypt, by Selma Botman. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999. xii + 115 pages. Notes to p. 124. Bibl. to p. 141. $45 cloth; $13.95 paper. Reviewed by Arlene MacLeod

Selma Botman's clear and perceptive book argues that women are usually left out of politics, and brings gender into the discussions on the meaning and practice of citizenship in Egypt. She asks some important and interesting questions: What is the experience of citizenship for Egyptian women? What do changing historical circumstances do to shape women's experiences? Who defines citizenship in Egypt, and how? The author answers these questions by providing an introductory discussion of the concept of citizenship and its intersection with gender; by covering three distinct periods in Egypt's 20th century political history; and by rethinking the concepts of patriarchy and citizenship. Ultimately, Botman hopes to contribute to our understanding of Egypt's political history, and to the literature on gender in the developing world.

Discussing citizenship, Botman reviews the work of Carole Pateman, Jean Bethke Elshtain, and others who have argued that women are often left out of considerations of politics and citizenry altogether. When women are included, it is generally as a note of contrast; women exist in the private realm, on which the political world is founded and from which it remains conceptually distinct. Women become, in this account, a kind of necessary foundation for the possibility of politics, with the ability to use their intuition and emotion to shape families and households. They are also divorced, by definition, from the realm of public action, for their obligations and nature suit them to the private, the emotive, the family. Botman also uses authors who discuss the Islamic tradition, drawing on Fatima Mernissi, for example, who argues that the Islamic tradition holds more than one view of women's nature and proper place, and that democratization requires a rethinking of Middle Eastern families.

The strongest part of the book is the three chapters which cover three distinct periods of political history: the 1920s nationalist, semi-liberal period; the state-run socialism of the Gamal `Abd al-Nasir period; and the open door era (from the 1970s through the 1990s) of Anwar Sadat and Hosni Mubarak. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Women: Engendering Citizenship in Egypt
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.