Observations on the IBCT/and the FBCB2

By Saeli, Jeffrey A. | Infantry, May-August 2000 | Go to article overview

Observations on the IBCT/and the FBCB2


Saeli, Jeffrey A., Infantry


This article is based upon a study I conducted at Fort Lewis concerning the Interim Brigade Combat Team (IBCT) and the Force XXI Battle Command, Brigade and Below (FBCB2) information system. My principal duties as a data collector included observation of and commentary on the doctrine and tactics of the IBCT, and observation and commentary on the efficacy and integration of the FBCB2.

I draw my conclusions from direct observation of the IBCT and the FBCB2, and discussions with leaders and operators from the battalion commander down to the soldier level. In addition, my military experience and civilian education, viewed as a whole, provide me with a solid background against which to evaluate the incorporation of advanced information systems into a military force at the battalion/brigade level and below.

I agree with the senior Army leadership concerning the need for a major force revision in light of emerging geopolitical realities-global American military dominance, the emergence of asymmetric threats, the absence of a regional conventional threat capable of force projection, continued democratization of the globe, an established global economy, an established global media presence, and the United States' contemporary role as an overseas political leader.

We need a significantly restructured force, tailored to meet emerging threats, and comprising the elements of deployability, lethality, restraint, and an ability-and willingnessto execute diverse and extended operations in environments ranging from "peacekeeping" and similar operations other than war (OOTW) to major theater war (MTW). The IBCT is the nascent expression of this realization, and integrating of such a force into the larger, contemporary Army is the goal of the ongoing effort at Fort Lewis.

With this goal in mind, we must realize that mission requirements of the IBCT must be carefully focused. Fielding a successful, effective force with a definitive mission essential task list (METL) requires changes to both doctrine and modified tables of organization and equipment (MTOEs). Concurrent with the development of this force is the effort to integrate an advanced information system. Either task would be difficult alone; attempting them together requires close analysis of each competing effort, and of the synergistic effect of simultaneous development.

Capabilities, Limitations, and Emerging Concepts

The IBCT accepts risk through decreased survivability by a reduction in armor protection and firepower in its proposed principal weapons platform, the light armored vehicle (LAV) with a 105mm main gun. This risk is mitigated by doctrinal recognition of a need to augment the IBCT with more robust, conventional armored forces at the high end of the conflict spectrum mitigates. Other mitigating factors are the situational awareness provided by the FBCB2 as an integrated command and control platform for the collection and dissemination of intelligence, the rapid identification of and reaction to enemy threats, and the enhanced integration of supporting forces at all levels.

Capabilities. The IBCT and FBCB2 provide the commander with a robust force structure, well equipped to meet a variety of threats. Company commanders have significant assets under their direct control: sniper teams equipped with both .50 caliber and 7.62mm rifles, multiple-caliber mortar systems (120mm, 81mm, and 60mm), mounted infantry platoons made up of robust rifle squads and weapons squads, integrated sharpshooters and designated Javelin gunners, and a mobile gun system platoon.

This "arms room" concept allows the commander to select force levels and weapons appropriate to the mission, and also to task organize his individual platoons and provide them with enough firepower to operate independently in a diverse and extended environment. The FBCB2 provides the command and control necessary for individual platoons to conduct dissimilar missions at the same time in geographically separated areas. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Observations on the IBCT/and the FBCB2
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.