National Art Education Association Constitution and Bylaws

Art Education, July 2001 | Go to article overview

National Art Education Association Constitution and Bylaws


Adopted 1995, Revised 1999

PREAMBLE TO THE CONSTITUTION

The National Art Education Association through its Constitution sets forth the means by which the aspirations of those responsible for programs of art education can be supported and extended.

As an organization, we affirm our faith in the power of the visual arts to enrich the lives and endeavors of humankind. In a highly technological society such as ours, the visual arts serve as a humanizing force, giving dignity and a sense of worth to the individual. They provide the means by which aesthetic quality and order are derived from the exercise of an individual's creativity and critical understanding.

It is our purpose to promote and maintain the highest possible quality of instruction in visual arts programs under whatever auspices they are fostered.

It shall be our intent to communicate our belief to the organized teaching profession and to the community-at-- large, to strengthen the position of the visual arts as a discipline in the schools, and to affect positively the role of art education in the culture.

We dedicate ourselves to aesthetic and humanistic growth and quality performance in art. With these as our goals, we support visual arts and humanities programs that provide depth and breadth of experience in art in order to meet the needs, interests, and abilities of the varied individuals we teach.

THE CONSTITUTION

ARTICLE I - Name

The organization shall be known as the National Art Education Association.

ARTICLE II - Purposes

The purpose of the Association is to promote art education through professional development, service, advancement of knowledge, and leadership. To that end, the Association will: promote quality instruction in visual arts education conducted by certified teachers of art; to that end the association will encourage research in art education; hold public discussions; sponsor institutes, conferences, and programs; publish articles, reports, and surveys; and work with other related agencies in support of art education. Since the mission of the Association is to be a non-profit education organization, it shall only engage in activities consistent with its status as defined in Section 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 or any successor provision thereto.

ARTICLE III - Membership

Individuals interested in, or engaged in activities concerned with, or related to art, art education, or education are eligible for membership.

ARTICLE IV - Organization and Governance

Section 1: ORGANIZATION. The NAEA shall be organized to include national officers, a Board of Directors, an Executive Committee, Regional Officers, a Delegates Assembly, Divisions, Affiliated Groups.

Section 2: NATIONAL OFFICERS. The officers of the National Art Education Association shall be a President, President-Elect, and Past President

Section 3: TERMS OF OFFICE. The term of office of all NAEA Board members will be for two years. No Board member shall simultaneously hold more than one office nor succeed him or herself.

Section 4: BOARD OF DIRECTORS. The Board of Directors, hereinafter referred to as NAEA Board, shall be composed of the President, President-Elect, Past President, Regional Vice Presidents, the Divisional Directors, and the Executive Director (ex officio without vote). Two-thirds of the members of the NAEA Board shall constitute a quorum. The NAEA Board shall be the executive authority of the Association. The President shall serve as Chair of the Board and of the Executive Committee.

Section 5: EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. The Executive Committee shall be composed of the President, President-- Elect, Past President, one Vice President and one Division Director elected from the NAEA Board, and the Executive Director (ex officio without vote).

Section 6: REGIONS. A region shall be composed of a group of States/Provinces as recommended by the Delegates Assembly and approved by the NAEA Board.

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