The Heart of Confederate Appalachia: Western North Carolina in the Civil War

By Battershell, Gary | The Arkansas Historical Quarterly, Summer 2001 | Go to article overview

The Heart of Confederate Appalachia: Western North Carolina in the Civil War


Battershell, Gary, The Arkansas Historical Quarterly


The Heart of Confederate Appalachia: Western North Carolina in the Civil War. By John C. Inscoe and Gordon B. McKinney. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000. Pp. xi, 386. Acknowledgments, introduction, illustrations, maps, notes, bibliography, index. $39.95.)

John C. Inscoe and Gordon B. McKinney's new book offers a painstaking examination of western North Carolina during the secession crisis, the Civil War, and the war's immediate aftermath, but it fails to provide an adequate explanation of the reasons the highlanders behaved as they did during this crucial period in United States history. The authors argue that the highlanders were more devoted to their communities than to any abstract idea of a southern nation; that many maintained loyalty to the Union, though more out of self-interest than patriotism; and that many were provoked into embracing the Confederate war effort by a sense of outraged honor after the firing on Fort Sumter and President Lincoln's calling up of 75,000 militiamen. On the war's ultimate effect, Inscoe and McKinney argue that while "[i]ts immediate economic and social impact was overwhelmingly negative... by destroying the viability of the more traditional community system, the Civil War eased the way for the modernization of western North Carolina" (p. 285).

The authors are clear in their depiction of the highlanders as, at best, lukewarm revolutionaries. Once it became obvious that the war would be a prolonged struggle and, particularly, after the Confederate government instituted what many perceived to be a coercive and unfair draft law in April of 1862, the highlanders' loyalty began to wane. Inscoe and McKinney detail the conflict between the local Unionists and Confederates and provide effective and thorough accounts of the bushwhacking, raiding, and general turmoil of the times. Little effort is made, however, to place this tableau in a larger context. In fact, the trajectory described for the residents of western North Carolina-initial support for the war effort followed by resentment of the "Slave Power" and a desire for reconciliation with the Union-was, as others have argued, followed in many parts of the upper South.

In Arkansas, for example, a plot was hatched by Unionists to bring about the secession of six Ozark counties (Ted R. Worley, "The Arkansas Peace Society of 1861: A Study of Mountain Unionism," Journal of Southern History 24 [November 1958]: 445-456). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Heart of Confederate Appalachia: Western North Carolina in the Civil War
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.