Building the Essential Partnerships

International Trade Forum, January 1, 2004 | Go to article overview

Building the Essential Partnerships


CHALLENGES

New business realities demand new partnerships for effective trade strategies.

Export strategies are the key to helping a critical mass of firms succeed, not just the individual companies that make it despite the odds. The strategies must focus on more than trade promotion and embrace development if countries are to increase exports. This shift implies new partnerships, as well as changed roles for traditional partners.

First, business and government need to work more closely. Partnership balances the public sector's power to create better business conditions with the private sector s ability to create jobs and exports.

Often business and government don't trust each other and have different goals. They do, however, have a common goal in wanting economic prosperity. Governments should lead strategy development. But as the "doer" of trade, business needs to become a more involved and informed trade development partner.

second, trade development strategists must reach out to new players. Why? From environmental trade barriers to technological compatibility, new trends affect trade. National standards bodies, communications technology entities, banks and investment institutions, labour organizations, women entrepreneurs' groups, environmental industry groups, arbitration and mediation centres, and educational institutions are just a few of those that offer keys to competitiveness, as the topics in this publication have shown. Bringing them into a broader trade support network helps countries use export development as a stepping-stone to economic growth.

Third, for partnerships to work, they need to be anchored in mutually agreed strategies, with realistic priorities, targets, responsibilities and means to achieve them. Strategies are a basis for building confidence among partners. They provide a baseline to monitor results. By formalizing them, there is also a better chance for continuity. Strategies can suffer from short political cycles or turnover in business leadership. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Building the Essential Partnerships
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.