Meet 21 Young Artists with Promising Careers

Southwest Art, September 2001 | Go to article overview

Meet 21 Young Artists with Promising Careers


Realism Today

IN THIS MONTH'S REALISM TODAY SERIES WE INTRODUCE YOU to 21 artists who are 31 years old or younger-an exciting survey of the next generation of western American artists. Talented and dedicated to their careers, these twenty- and thirty-somethings are beginning to make their mark in the art world, attracting the attention of galleries and collectors across the country. Judging by these examples, the future of western art looks bright.

Tony Peters

California

Born: Worthington, MINI, 1976.

Art education: Bachelor of fine arts from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, CA.

Style of work- Painterly style grounded in realism.

First art sale: "In 1999 1 brought my work to Tirage Gallery in Pasadena while I was still in art school. A client of the gallery came in and bought one before I was even represented."

Second-choice career. "When I was working my way through school, I worked in a gallery. If I weren't a painter I guess that's what I would do, but I really have to paint"

Favorite artists: Painters in the Ashcan school.

Favorite subject: Urban landscapes.

Other passions: Taking long lunches, going to the gym, and participating in church activities.

Fantasy art trip: "Last year I spent a month in Europe going to the great museums in Paris, Berlin, and Amsterdam. I wanted to do that for as long as I can remember. Next I want to go to Spain and Italy."

Favorite studio music: Mozart, U2, Sting, and Louis Armstrong.

Pet peeve: Art that doesn't have a point. "I want to do work that will leave its mark and work that I feel is important to myself and moving to others."

Favorite artworks: "Richard Bunkall was a huge influence on me as a teacher. He taught me the importance of doing what's important"

Creative spark: "I have a huge collection of art books-my studio is packed from floor to ceiling. I also get inspired by going to museums and galleries."

Next big goal: To finish an epic landscape painting with multiple figures. Price range: $1,000$4,000.

Galleries: Tinge Gallery, Pasadena, CA.

Ruth Sorenson

Washington

Born: Seattle, WA, 1975.

Art education: Bachelor of fine arts from Cornish College of the Arts, Seattle, WA.

Style of work: Realism.

First art sale. "When I was 16, I sold a drawing of flowers to one of my highschool art teachers for 20 bucks. I was totally flattered and I felt rich."

First artwork: I used to draw the ferryboats in Seattle when I was 4 years old.

Then I moved on to flowers."

Second-choice career: Nurse. Favorite artists: Alice Neel and Jan Vermeer.

Favorite subject: "Landscapes, especially ones inspired by Alaska, where I was raised."

Other passions: "I'm an avid cyclist."

Fantasy art trip: Biking through New Zealand.

Favorite studio music: "I'm a big NPR fan. I have it on almost constantly."

Pot peeve: Washing brushes. "My email name is 'dirty brushes.'"

Favorite artwork: WOMAN IN BLUE by Jan Vermeer.

Creative spark: Art sales and a good bike ride.

Next big goal: "Lose the day job. I'd like to be able to paint full time." Price range: $800-$4,000.

Galleries: Martha Keats Gallery, Santa Fe, NM; Baas Gallery, Seattle, WA.

Julia Bauernfeind

California

Boom: Klagenfurt, Austria, 1971.

Art education: Master of fine arts degree from California State University in Long Beach. Studied art history at the University of Vienna in Austria.

Style of work: Representational. First art sale: PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG GIRL (CORNELIA) in 1988.

Second-choice career: A mixture of writer, historian, traveler, photographer, journalist, philosopher, teacher, furniture builder, and gardener.

Favorite artists: Hieronymus Bosch, Paul Cezanne, Edgar Degas, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Egon Schiele, Mark Rothko, Lucian Freud, and many more.

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