NAACP Holds Convention in Philadelphia

By Gamber, Frankie | The Crisis, July/August 2004 | Go to article overview

NAACP Holds Convention in Philadelphia


Gamber, Frankie, The Crisis


Thousands of NAACP members will converge on the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia for the association's 95th annual national convention, July 10 to 15. The theme for this year's convention is "The Race Is On," and its organizers are making the most of its historic location.

"It's exciting for the Pennsylvania State Conference to be hosting the national convention," says Pennsylvania State Conference President Burrell A. Brown, who is based in Pittsburgh. "We're really looking forward to it."

Philadelphia Mayor John Street, National Urban League President Marc Morial and Rep. Chaka Fattah (D-Pa.) will greet delegates at the first plenary session on July 12. Convention workshops will include information on effective voter empowerment and issue advocacy tactics, examine the lingering problern of housing segregation and probe the causes of youth violence. Entertainment for the convention ranges from the humorous comedy of Bill Cosby to the soul-stirring sounds of Frankie Beverly and Maze and Yolanda Adams.

Delegates will also get a taste of some Philadelphia Black history. The Late Night Worship Service on July 12 will take place at the historic Mother Bethel AME church, which was cofounded in 1797 by Richard Alien. He established the African Methodist Episcopal Church and was its first bishop. The church served as a stop on the Underground Railroad, and the site is the oldest piece of land in the nation successively held by African Americans. …

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