Celts and Christians: New Approaches to the Religious Traditions of Britain and Ireland

By Holder, Arthur G. | Anglican Theological Review, Winter 2005 | Go to article overview

Celts and Christians: New Approaches to the Religious Traditions of Britain and Ireland


Holder, Arthur G., Anglican Theological Review


Celts and Christians: New Approaches to the Religious Traditions of Britain and Ireland. Edited by Mark Atherton. Religion, Culture, and Society Series. Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2002. xii + 211 pp. $39.95 (paper).

This attractive volume of essays is perhaps the best introduction now available to what might be described as the new "middle way" that has emerged in the study of Celtic Christianity. Recent works on this topic have tended to divide into two polarized camps, as Mark Atherton observes in his introduction:

Thus the "popular" camp can speak of "environmentally friendly" Celts, "non-hierarchical and non-sexist"; moreover, all the texts are treated as part of one unified culture, without making any clear distinction between the various contexts in which they developed. Against this, we find serious scholars denying any connection whatsoever between the various speakers of Celtic languages other than geography, or casting doubt on suggestions that the Christian cultures of these nations had any particular connection with "nature" (p. 1).

Eschewing both extremes, the eight authors represented here affirm the scholarly camp s insistence on the diversity of Celtic Christianities and their integral relation to other Christian traditions, while continuing to join the popular camp in discerning some key "family traits" uniting various Celtic Christian spiritualities. His fellow essayists would probably agree with D. Densil Morgan when he lists the common Celtic traits as "a Trinitarian vision of reality, a holding together of the motifs of creation and redemption, an incamational attitude to the material world, and a sense of community which expresses a continuity with an ancient and pre-Christian past" (p. 146).

The four essays in part 1 ("Identities") are the most explicit about questions of methodology. Both Oliver Davies and Jonathan M. Wooding deal with the constructed and contested character of that slippery term "Celtic" and its usefulness as a designation for early medieval Christians in Britain and Ireland. Elva Johnston considers "pagan" and "Christian" elements in the literary lives of Irish female saints with a focus on Brigit, whose cult she judiciously describes as "one that grew up around a saint named after a divine figure" (p.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Celts and Christians: New Approaches to the Religious Traditions of Britain and Ireland
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.