New Faces

By Wagner, Janet | Humanities, January/February 2005 | Go to article overview
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New Faces


Wagner, Janet, Humanities


Eight new members have joined the National Council on the Humanities, a board of twenty-six private citizens who meet four times a year to review grant applications and advise the chairman on the Endowment's policies, programs, and procedures. Council members serve six-year terms and are appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate.

Herman Belz is a professor of American history at the University of Maryland in College Park and has served as a consultant to the American Historical Association's Constitutional History in the Schools project. He was a visiting research scholar in the James Madison Program at Princeton University from 2001 to 2002.

Craig Haffner, president and CEO of Greystone Communications, Inc. in North Hollywood, produces documentaries including Emmy winners Hitler: Man and Myth and Pearl Harbor.

James Davidson Hunter, William R. Kenan Jr. Professor of Sociology and Religious Studies at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, is the author of seven books and numerous essays and articles. His most recent book, Death of Character, examines moral education in America.

Tamar Jacoby is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, a public policy think tank in New York. Her book Someone Else's House: America's Unfinished Struggle for Integration deals with race relations; her Reinventing the Melting Pot: The New Immigrants and What It Means To Be American explores issues of assimilation.

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