SIRSI Corp. Unveils JurisLink, Announces System Implementations

Information Today, September 2001 | Go to article overview

SIRSI Corp. Unveils JurisLink, Announces System Implementations


SIRSI Corp. has announced the release of JurisLink, a new library management system that is tailored to the needs of law libraries. SIRSI has also announced that the National Library of Education (NLE) has selected the company's Unicorn library management system and the Hyperion Digital Media Archive to provide online access to its collections. In addition, the Old Colony Library Network (OCLN), a consortium of 26 Boston-area libraries, has selected SIRSI's UnicornConsorti@.

Jurislink

According to the company, JurisLink was developed in response to law libraries' need to provide users with easy electronic access to knowledge and resources from within the library or from anywhere in the world.

The new JurisLink software configuration includes the iLink Electronic Library with "eSearcher" simultaneous database searching and "MyLink" selective dissemination of information (SDI). Also included are Z39.50 Version 3 Server with Level 1 Bath Profile compliance, a bibliographic catalog with dynamic total keyword indexing, acquisitions and fund accounting with electronic data interchange (EDI), serials check-in and control with UDC automatic check-in, SmartPORT for Z39.50 copy cataloging with OCLC Automatic Post Holdings, and circulation control with reserves.

Doug Livsey, SIRSI's director of special libraries, said: "JurisLink provides fully integrated technology that enables law libraries... to manage all technical services, as well as meet the unique needs of legal researchers. Through the iLink Electronic Library, researchers can immediately access accurate, current content, such as high-quality MARC-cataloged Web sites, book reviews, tables of contents, excerpts and first chapters, e-books, and online journals. Through JurisLink and il-ink, users of law libraries can enjoy benefits from today's most powerful library and Internet technologies."

National Library of Education

Sheila McGarr, National Library of Education director, said: "With its 20-year track record and an established user base for both library automation and digital archiving systems, we believe SIRSI meets all of the requirements allowing the NLE to provide a seamlessly integrated library and media-archiving system to our customers."

The NLE is open to the public for on-site use and accepts inquiries through a toll-free telephone line and the Internet. However, it circulates materials only to U.S. Department of Education staff and contractors. Its collections consist of materials about education, with special emphasis on theory, policy, and research. In addition to the general collection-which consists of nearly 100,000 books, approximately 800 periodical subscriptions, and more than 450,000 microforms-NLE has a number of special collections, including histories of education legislation passed by Congress, books about education published before 1800, and 19thand early-20th-century textbooks. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

SIRSI Corp. Unveils JurisLink, Announces System Implementations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.