Army Reserve Family Program Office Reaches out to the Families of Mobilized Irr/ima/uau/ia Soldiers

By Georgia, Anderia | Army Reserve Magazine, December 1, 2004 | Go to article overview

Army Reserve Family Program Office Reaches out to the Families of Mobilized Irr/ima/uau/ia Soldiers


Georgia, Anderia, Army Reserve Magazine


It's 5:30 p.m. and without any prior notice, a telegram is delivered to the door informing you that your country needs you immediately to help fight the Global War on Terrorism. The message further states that you are being called to active duty and expected to report in 30 days. When the shock begins to wear off, questions begin to formulate in your mind. Prioritizing the concerns can be overwhelming. Concerns such as family, current job, finances, and medical plans begin to sink further and further into your mind. You start to wonder where to begin. You wonder how your family's needs will be met during your military separation. These concerns are real. But help is available!

Recent publicity of the involuntary mobilization of 5,600 Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) Soldiers has given the Army Reserve Family Program Office the opportunity to build awareness of a program already in place to assist the families of mobilized Individual Ready Reserve (IRR), Individual Mobilization Augmentee (IMA), USARC Augmentation Unit (UAU), and Individual Augmentee (IA) Soldiers. On Aug. 1,2002, the Army Reserve Command formally established the IRR/IMA Family Program Office and assigned it the responsibility of providing information on benefits, entitlements, resources, and referrals to the families of mobilized IRR/IMA Soldiers. Since that time the Army Reserve Family Program Office has taken on the responsibility of assisting the families of the UAU Soldiers. Most recently the Family Program Office began assisting the families of the 5,600 involuntary mobilized IRR Soldiers.

You are not alone if you find yourself asking what an IRR, IMA, UAU, or IA Soldier is and how his or her mission is different from any other Soldier's mission. The Army Reserve Individual Ready Reserve (IRR) Soldier is not associated with a unit nor does the Soldier train with a unit. The IRR Soldier is held in a manpower pool, readily available to be mobilized individually to fill a critical Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) in a mobilizing unit, depending on the needs of the Army. The IRR Soldier may have previously served in either the Active Component, Army National Guard, or a position in the Army Reserve and may be fulfilling time remaining in a mandatory Military Service Obligation (MSO). Because the Soldier may mobilize with a unit that is located miles away from the family, there is no connection to a local unit to provide assistance or information.

The Individual Mobilization Augmentee (IMA) may be a part of a Reserve Troop Program Unit (TPU), Active Component Unit, Selective Service System, or a Federal Emergency Management Agency position for training purposes, depending on the Soldier's Military Occupational Specialty. Although the IMA Soldier may train with a unit they are still mobilized individually to meet the immediate needs of the Army. The IMA Soldier may mobilize with a unit miles away from his/her family. Like the fami lies of the IRR Soldier they too are often left behind without a sense of connection to a local unit for assistance or information.

The U.S. Army Reserve Command (USARC) Augmentation Unit (UAU) and Individual Augmentee (IA) Soldier is the way of the future for the Army Reserve Soldiers. These Reserve Soldiers are used to fill positions that augment or fill shortages in mobilized Reserve Units or Active Army Units. The UAU has implemented a plan that will change the way that IA Soldiers are mobilized in the future. The IA Program consists of a volunteer pool of drilling Reserve Soldiers that are deployable and ready to mobilize when the need arises.

Individual Augmentee Soldiers will be assigned to the UAU once they receive a DA alert or mobilization order.

The commonality among the IRR/IMA and IA Soldiers is that they mobilize individually and not with a unit. Many of the families of IRR/IMA/IA Soldiers have never experienced a long term separation from their loved one, had a need for a Military ID card, or had a need to access information on dependent benefits and services provided by the Family Program Office. …

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