Learning and Unlearning in Accordance with Organizational Change

By Rampersad, Hubert K. | Organization Development Journal, Winter 2004 | Go to article overview

Learning and Unlearning in Accordance with Organizational Change


Rampersad, Hubert K., Organization Development Journal


Abstract

Organizational change is a learning process. Changing oneself can occur after learning new things and unlearning others. Individual learning must then be converted into collective learning, leading ultimately to organizational change. This article introduces a new change management model and checklists that facilitate this learning process and benefit the durability of organizational changes. It is based on Total Performance Scorecard; Redefining Management to Achieve Performance with Integrity, Butterworth-Heinemann Business Books, 2003.

Knowledge and Learning

Knowledge is a function of information, culture, and skills (Rampersad, 2003):

= f (, , )

The function specifies the relationship between knowledge on the one side and information, culture, and skills on the other. In this context, information comprises the meaning given to data or information obtained according to certain conventions; this is also known as explicit knowledge (Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995). On the one hand, culture is the total amount of standards, values, views, principles and attitudes of people that underscore their behavior and functioning. On the other hand, skills are related to the capability, ability, and personal experience of people; the term relates to what people can do, know, and understand. The knowledge components, culture, and skills represent implicit knowledge, which depends on the individual and is stored in the minds of people. This concept is difficult to describe, is based on experience, is practical in nature, and finds its source, among other things, in associations, intuitions, and fantasies. Explicit knowledge, on the contrary, is not dependent on the individual, is theoretical in nature and is specified as procedures, theories, equations, manuals, drawings etc. This knowledge is stored mainly in management information and technical systems, and organizational routines. The central question here is, how can knowledge be transformed into new behavior? Thus, how can people learn effectively so that they can function better? If knowledge is to lead to competent action, then learning should receive special attention, and the organizational culture and structure should stimulate and support it.

Knowledge ages rapidly and is liable to wear. That is why one should constantly learn. Learning is a continuous personal transformation. It is a cyclic and cumulative process of the continuous actualization of knowledge (adding new things to knowledge repertory), in order to change behavior to function and act better. It is a permanent change in knowledge and behavior partly due to repeated experiences. Here the intention is improving the quality of thinking and acting. In view of the increasing shift from lifetime employment to lifetime employability, people must make sure that their knowledge is up to date. An organization is indeed more successful if its employees learn more quickly and implement and commercialize knowledge faster than do competing workers. An organization that does not learn continuously and is not able to continuously list, develop, share, mobilize, cultivate, put into practice, review, and spread knowledge will not be able to compete effectively. That is why the ability of an organization to improve existing skills and acquire new ones forms its most tenable competitive advantage.

It is, therefore, imperative to constantly know which knowledge is essential, where it is available in the organization, which associate possesses this skill, how this knowledge can be adequately utilized, how it can be shared, how this provides added value, and how it can be maintained. The knowledge infrastructure within the organization must be organized in such a way that effective team work, creativity, positive thinking, self-confidence and a good learning environment are stimulated by, for example, the use of computers, Internet and intranet, design of a knowledge-bank, presence of a library, continuous training, an auditorium, organization of brainstorming sessions, and review meetings.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Learning and Unlearning in Accordance with Organizational Change
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.