Patients' Rights & Health Care Reform

By Churchill, Christopher J. | Volta Voices, January/February 2005 | Go to article overview

Patients' Rights & Health Care Reform


Churchill, Christopher J., Volta Voices


Eighty percent of voters in the recent presidential election rated health care as a top issue. Rising health care costs ranked among the highest of voter concerns based upon a post-election survey conducted on behalf of America's health insurance plans.

However, in an election dominated by the war on terrorism, many voters said that the presidential debate on health care lacked focus and did not offer specific solutions. Less than 10 percent of voters reported that health care issues actually influenced their vote.

Also, while voters recognize the need for health care reform, most voters report that they are satisfied with their own health care coverage. Voters favor more choice in making health care decisions and generally favor private sector solutions rather than government intervention.

Still, most voters recognize that the government plays an important role in regulating the health care industry. For example, nine out of 10 voters believe that the government should monitor the performance of health care organizations. Also, by a four to one margin, voters favor independent review of HMO and insurance coverage decisions.

Rather than supporting a complete overhaul of the health care system, the majority of voters favor a more limited strategy of targeted reform measures. As part of this strategy, voters say they would welcome private-public partnerships that lower health care costs and improve quality.

Now that the election is over, many voters are demanding that health care issues be given higher priority. Most voters agree that medical malpractice reform, a top campaign issue for President Bush, will remain an important priority of the administration. However, voters express other concerns, including the need for patients' rights laws and HMO reform measures. Where the election leaves these other issues remains uncertain.

Some experts have questioned whether the administration's efforts to curtail frivolous lawsuits through medical malpractice reform will have negative consequences for the passage of a National Patients Rights Law. These experts predict that legislative efforts to restrict patient lawsuits against doctors will have the indirect consequence of dampening support for patients' rights laws which allow patients to pursue claims against HMOs or insurers for adverse coverage decisions.

Ironically, the beneficiaries of medical malpractice reform, namely doctors and health care providers, largely favor laws that expand patients' rights, including a patient's right to challenge HMO coverage decisions. Such laws also are consistent with the public's demand for greater choice by placing health care decisions in the hands of doctors rather than in the hands of insurers.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Patients' Rights & Health Care Reform
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.