Beyond Duty: Insurance Management in Education Abroad Programs

By Braun, Harald; Gemmeke, Jürgen | International Educator, March/April 2005 | Go to article overview

Beyond Duty: Insurance Management in Education Abroad Programs


Braun, Harald, Gemmeke, Jürgen, International Educator


ALTHOUGH FOR MOST EDUCATION ABROAD PROFESSIONALS an in-depth discussion of the importance of proper insurance for students may have a similar allure to watching paint dry, the underlying importance of the quality of insurance that is required, offered, and eventually purchased cannot be overstated. When it comes to education abroad insurance the following questions are pivitol: Are the industry's minimum standards-those provisions that are either required by law or without which it would be reckless to operate any education abroad activity-enough? If not, what enhancements could be made? And, what could be done, on the grounds of moral responsibility of the field, to achieve an even better yet still realistic level of protection that might be best described as the "gold standard?"

An industry standard is not a good one if it merely takes the instiution a little beyond the reckless. Nor is a standard effective, even though at one time it was deemed sufficient, if it is not reviewed and amended to take into account changes in the way the world operates. This has specific relevancy for the field of education abroad. In this context, the field needs to go beyond mere compliance and needs to become proactive in extending the duty of care beyond "duty" by embracing standards that protect participants as effectively as possible while securing the interests of institutions, organizations, and individuals involved in all aspects of education abroad. We also need to look beyond those standards that are drawn from U.S. domestic perspectives. Education abroad is, by its very nature, exposing participants and institutions to risks outside of, and beyond, those incurred in the United States. The risks are not necessarily greater but they will be different.

During the last 20 years, education abroad has not only expanded enormously, it has also considerably enhanced its operational elements. Those in, or serving, the education abroad field spend more time than ever thinking about ethical marketing, preparation for study abroad, reentry, safety and security, experiential education, academic outcomes and so on. The Forum on Education Abroad's review of "Standards of Good Practice for Education Abroad"1 represents a major step forward in the process of professionalizing our field. Nevertheless, community awareness of issues of liability, risk, and insurance has received less significant, professional attention than other areas in the education abroad enterprise. And so it is that the primary objective of this discussion is to refocus attention to areas that are crucial for both the well-being of students and the security oi organizations and institutions.

Minimum Standards

The simplest summary of the minimum required is probably that found in the standards defined by The Council on Standards for International Educational Travel (CSIET).2

"The organization shall guarantee that every student is covered with adequate health and accident insurance. Such insurance shall: a) Protect students for the duration of their program, and b) Provide for the return of the student to his/her home in the event of serious illness, accident, or death during the program."

The most obvious issue in this context is the notion of "adequate." CSIET makes several useful efforts at defining what that might mean. The key factors are that adequate insurance, as defined by CSIET, should have the following characteristics:

* The provisions should be defined in English and coverage should make provision for both sickness and accident.

* Deductibles should be limited and reasonable.3

* Minimum sums covered should be $5,000 for mental and nervous disorders, $50,000 for each accident or illness, $10,000 for repatriation, and $7,500 for the repatriation of remains.

* There should be some provision to cover preexisting conditions after a one-year waiting period.

The standards proposed by CSIET provide a substantial starting point for some of the risks that may be incurred by (only) one of the participants in the educational enterprise: the participating student. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Beyond Duty: Insurance Management in Education Abroad Programs
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.