Inside Washington

By Turner, Jim | ASEE Prism, March 2005 | Go to article overview

Inside Washington


Turner, Jim, ASEE Prism


Undergraduates gain public policy experience through internships in the nation's capital.

WHAT DO THE offices of several leading senators, the House of Representatives' Energy and Commerce Committee, the White House Office of Management and Budget, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the World Bank have in common? (1) All influence what engineers work on, how they do it, and even how much they are paid. (2) All typically are run by lawyers or those with M.B.A.'s who don't always understand how engineers work or think. (3) And all sing the praises of the talented engineering students that MIT and the University of Virginia (UVa) are sending them each summer, free of charge.

Five years ago, former UVa engineering dean Richard Miksad joined forces with MIT's ongoing schoolwide summer intern program, directed by Tobie Weiner and political science professor Charles Stewart, to design a program that would provide undergraduates with firsthand policy experience in Washington, D.C. Miksad, Weiner, and Stewart recognized the role engineers can and should play in assisting legislators to better understand the technological aspects of public policy. Engineers ignore public policy at their peril. Those making government decisions affecting engineering use the best available information, but if engineers don't help them understand how the world of engineering really works, imperfect solutions can result.

Now, all around Washington,offices are opening their doors to engineering students. Last summer at the White House, the Office of Science and Technology Policy engaged an undergraduate intern from UVa, while an undergraduate engineer from MIT worked at its Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. The first intern to work in the Office of the Science Adviser at the State Department was from UVa's engineering school, while the first engineering student to work on patent legislation at the House of Representatives' Judiciary Committee came from MIT. Once these offices experience the talent, they usually ask for more students. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Inside Washington
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.