Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect: Methodology

By Trocme, Nico M; MacLaurin, Bruce J et al. | Canadian Journal of Public Health, July/August 2001 | Go to article overview

Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect: Methodology


Trocme, Nico M, MacLaurin, Bruce J, Fallon, Barbara A, Daciuk, Joanne F, et al., Canadian Journal of Public Health


ABSTRACT

This article describes the methodology of the first Canada-wide study of the incidence and characteristics of reported child abuse and neglect. Child welfare investigators from a random sample of 51 child welfare service areas completed a three-page survey form describing the results of 7,672 child maltreatment reports received during the months of October to December 1998. The study documented a 90% participation rate and a 95% item completion rate. An estimated 135,571 child maltreatment investigations were completed, a rate of 21.52 investigated children per 1,000 children in Canada in 1998. The Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect is a rich database that will provide researchers with important contextual information on reported child maltreatment in Canada and a comprehensive source of information on factors associated with key service decisions made by child welfare investigators.

A B R E G E

Cet article presence la methode de la premiere etude pancanadienne de (incidence et des caracteristiques des rapports de mauvais traitements et de negligence envers les enfants. Des enqueteurs de 51 secteurs de service de protection de l'enfance selectionnes au hasard ont decrit, dans un questionnaire de trois pages, les resultats de 7 672 rapports de violence envers les enfants presentes entre octobre et decembre 1998. Le taux de participation etait de 90 %, et le taux de reponse, de 95 %. En 1998 au Canada, on aurait fait enquete sur 135 571 cas de violence envers les enfants, soit 21,52 enquetes pour 1 000 enfants. Cette etude constitue une riche base de donnees qui offre d'imporrants renseignements contextuels sur les cas de violence envers les enfants signales au Canada, ainsi qu'une source exhaustive d'information sur les facteurs associes aux decisions prises par les services de protection.

There currently is no source of comprehensive, Canada-wide statistics on children and families investigated because of suspected child abuse and neglect. In Canada most child maltreatment statistics are kept on a provincial or territorial basis. Differences both in definitions of maltreatment and methods for counting cases mean that it is not possible to aggregate provincial and territorial statistics.' The amount of information collected at the provincial and territorial level is itself very limited, providing few details on children and families investigated by child welfare services. This paucity of provincial and national data hampers the ability of governments and social service providers to develop national and regional policies and programs that address child maltreatment. The absence of uniform national data is also a major obstacle for child maltreatment researchers who do not have access to the epidemiological data needed to contextualize findings based on clinical samples.

The only Canada-wide child maltreatment study that has been conducted examined the self-reported childhood prevalence of sexual abuse in a nationally representative sample of adult men and women.2 In addition, several province-wide population prevalence studies examining self-reported physical and sexual abuse have been conducted.3,4 While these studies provide critical information about prevalence and correlates of child physical and sexual abuse, they do not include information on cases that are reported to child welfare authorities, and do not cover neglect or emotional maltreatment. The 1993 Ontario Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (OIS) is the only provincewide study to examine the full range of forms of maltreatment investigated by child welfare authorities and a precursor of the present study.5

Child maltreatment statistics are limited in most countries with the exception of the United States. In addition to numerous population based prevalence studies, there are two major sources of statistics on reported child maltreatment in the United States. The National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS) provides the most extensive annual statistics on investigated maltreatment in the United States. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect: Methodology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.