Graduate Essay Finds Yale History Intertwined with Slavery

Black Issues in Higher Education, September 13, 2001 | Go to article overview

Graduate Essay Finds Yale History Intertwined with Slavery


NOTEWORTHY/NEWS FROM STAFF AND NEWS WIRE REPORTS

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

The founding fathers of Yale University and important men in the school's 300-- year history are remembered to this day in stone and stained glass.

But three graduate students report in a newly published essay that some of these Yale leaders and graduates earned their status through the blood and sweat of slaves.

Some of these men have residential colleges named after them, including one that was named in the middle of the 1960s civil rights struggle.

The university's history is being examined as some city leaders support reparations for the descendants of slaves and other institutions explore their links to slavery.

"Universities are all about pursuing the truth, and that's what we see going on here," says Antony Dugdale, one author of the essay. "All universities across the country should research their history and help this country come to terms with its past."

Yale spokesman Tom Conroy says the essay fits in with a yearlong examination of Yale's history on the 300th anniversary of its founding.

"No institution with a history stretching long before emancipation is untainted by the evils of slavery, and our discussion of those connections is important and worthwhile," Conroy says.

Yale is home to the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition.

The university also has among its prominent leaders and graduates many leaders in the abolitionist movement.

The essay's authors are labor union activists on campus. Dugdale is a full-time researcher for the Federation of Hospital and University Employees, and the other authors, J. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Graduate Essay Finds Yale History Intertwined with Slavery
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.