Protestantism and Political Conflict in the Nineteenth-Century Hispanic Caribbean

By Martinez, Juan Francisco | Anglican and Episcopal History, June 2003 | Go to article overview

Protestantism and Political Conflict in the Nineteenth-Century Hispanic Caribbean


Martinez, Juan Francisco, Anglican and Episcopal History


Luis MARTÎNEZ-FERNANDEZ. Protestantism and Political Conflict in the Nineteenth-Century Hispanic Caribbean. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 2002. Pp. xiii + 247, introduction, bibliography, index. $30.00 (paper).

As Spain and the United States were struggling for political hegemony in the, nineteenth-century Caribbean, a parallel struggle was occurring between Catholicism and Protestantism on the last two Spanish colonies in the area, Cuba and Puerto Rico. Dr. Luis Martinez-Fernândez analyzes this latter tension in light of changes occurring in Spain and their impact on religion and politics in these colonies. Attempts at political reform at home affected the colonies and, in particular, the role of the Roman Catholic Church. Calls for religious freedom attacked the church's privileged role in Spanish and colonial society. As the church was attempting to deal with its changing relationship to the government, it also had to address the growing number of non-Catholics (Protestants and Freemasons) migrating to the islands.

The Roman Catholic Church attempted to maintain social control, even as it was losing political influence. It pushed the government to limit immigration from non-Catholic countries. It used three areas where it had the most influence, birth, marriage and death, to maintain a level of social control. Since these activities were regulated by the church and not civil authorities, the church used them to maintain at least a formal Catholic commitment from most everyone that lived on the islands (and also to generate funds for the church). Priests used their power to force Protestants to formally practice Catholicism; unbaptized children could not be citizens, children of couples not married by the Roman Catholic Church could not inherit property, and people who were not baptized as Catholics could not be buried in public cemeteries. The burial issue was particularly influential because priests often blocked the burial of the bodies of non-Catholics. There were cases where bodies were left unburied to be eaten by animals. The pressure exerted by the Catholic Church through these rites caused many Protestant to formally become Catholics and externally follow the rites of the church. This situation caused some to become what Martínez-Fernández calls "CryptoProtestants" or "Pseudo-Catholics. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Protestantism and Political Conflict in the Nineteenth-Century Hispanic Caribbean
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.