North Korea Disavows Missile Moratorium; Talks Remain Stalled

By Kerr, Paul | Arms Control Today, April 2005 | Go to article overview

North Korea Disavows Missile Moratorium; Talks Remain Stalled


Kerr, Paul, Arms Control Today


On March 2, North Korea exacerbated the already tense nuclear crisis on the Korean peninsula, stating in a lengthy memorandum that Pyongyang is no longer bound by its more than five-year-old moratorium on testing longer-range missiles. Yet, North Korea did not say it will resume such testing.

The Foreign Ministry memorandum did not cite any recent events as reason for the decision, instead arguing that the moratorium is no longer "valid" because the Bush administration suspended previous missile negotiations between the two countries in March 2001, pending a policy review. At that time, North Korea stated that it could not maintain the moratorium "indefinitely."

North Korea originally pledged in September 1999 that it would not flight-test longer-range missiles as long as then-ongoing negotiations with the United States continued. About a year later, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il told Secretary of State Madeleine Albright that it would discontinue testing of its Taepo Dong-1 missile, which it had once test-fired over Japan in August 1998.

North Korea's explanation regarding the moratorium is curious because Pyongyang has reaffirmed the pledge on several occasions since March 2001. For example, Kim said in May 2001 that North Korea would extend the moratorium until 2003, and during a May 2004 summit meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi, Kim reaffirmed his September 2002 pledge to extend the moratorium indefinitely.

The 2,000-kilometer-range Taepo Dong-1 is the longest-range missile North Korea has flight-tested. As configured, that missile cannot reach the United States. A December 2001 National Intelligence Estimate stated that the longest-range missile North Korea has deployed is the 1,300-kilometer-range Nodong.

CIA Director Porter Goss told the Senate Armed Services Committee March 17 that North Korea could flight-test its longer-range Taepo Dong-2 missile "at any time," adding that the missile "is capable of reaching the United States with a nuclear-weapon-sized payload."

Other recent reports have been somewhat more qualified. A November CIA report stated that the Taepo Dong-2 "may" be ready for testing. It described the missile as "potentially capable of reaching parts of the United States."

Additionally, Assistant Secretary of State for Intelligence and Research Thomas Fingar told the Senate Intelligence Committee in February that there is "no evidence" that North Korea has produced nuclear weapons or "mated them to a missile capable of delivering them to the United States.

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North Korea Disavows Missile Moratorium; Talks Remain Stalled
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