New Study Finds School Segregation on the Rise

Techniques, October 2001 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

New Study Finds School Segregation on the Rise


Front and Center

The Civil Rights Project at Harvard recently released the results of a new study showing that school segregation grew throughout the 1990s. The study, "Schools More Separate: Consequences of a Decade of Resegregation," by Professor of Education and Social Policy Gary Orfield (who is also the co-director of The Civil Rights Project) with teaching fellow Nora Gordon, analyzes statistics from the 1998-99 school yearthe latest year of data available from the National Center for Education Statistics' Common Core of Education Statistics.

The study found that 70.2 percent of the nation's black students now attend predominantly minority schools-with more that a third attending schools with a minority enrollment of 90 to 100 percent. While schools in the South are still more integrated than before the civil rights movement of the 1960s, the percentage of black students in white majority schools decreased steadily from 1988 to 1998.

Data from the study shows that white students are the most segregated from other races-with white students on average attending schools where more than 80 percent of the other students are white.

The most dramatic findings related to the Latino student population, which has grown by 245 percent in the past 30 years.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

New Study Finds School Segregation on the Rise
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?